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Enrollment in private schools skyrocket during pandemic | New

When the COVID-19 pandemic struck, schools in Minnesota and the country found themselves in an unprecedented situation – what to do?

The distance learning model seemed to be the best way to ensure the safety of students, teachers and staff; schools were closed for the remainder of the 2020-21 school year.

While public schools have decided to maintain the distance education model at the start of the 2020-21 school year, most private schools have chosen to reintegrate their students into the classroom.

One of the first to open in Minnesota was Hill-Murray School in Maplewood, a private Catholic school for students in grades 6 to 12.

“Our management team worked tirelessly throughout the past summer with a lot of planning, hard work and confidence. We had the kids back to school on August 18, ”said Melissa Dan, President of Hill-Murray. “The teachers were nervous about coming back, but they took a risk and believed in us. We only stayed open all year due to their willingness to put kids first.

Dan has a son who is dating Hill-Murray. When they went to the in-person learning in August, she said she noticed a big change in him.

“The changes I saw in him from March until he could be in school every day were just amazing,” she said. “The students have never looked happier when they come back in August. Even though they had to wear masks and follow COVID guidelines, they were so happy to be with their friends again. “

Enrollment has grown at Hill-Murray over the past six years, and Dan said last year interest in the school has grown more than ever. She believes parents may not have viewed Hill-Murray as an educational option before the pandemic.

“As the public school districts did not open last fall, we had an incredible influx of people trying to enter the school in August and September. Unfortunately some of the classes were already full so we couldn’t take all the students who wanted to come, ”she said.

Why the increase in enrollment in private schools? According to the Minnesota Department of Education, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, families across the state made choices they believed were best for their students, including delaying entry to kindergarten for the youngest. Some have considered non-public options. There has been an increase in the number of parents who have chosen a private school for their children; Additionally, a 12.4% increase in kindergarten enrollment occurred between the 2019-2020 and 2020-21 school years.

Principal Vicki Marvin of St. Odilia School – a private Catholic school in Shoreview for kindergarten to grade eight students – said the school has definitely seen an increase in enrollment.

“We usually have a handful of families contacting us for registration, but last summer we had over a hundred new families in the choir,” Marvin said. “We welcomed 60 new transfer students over the summer for the 2020-21 school year and 100% of them are re-enrolled for this upcoming school year, and that’s exciting.”

Marvin also said she believes parents realize they have other educational options besides public school for their children.

“I think for some families who maybe weren’t sure whether or not to choose a private school, it was enough for them to say, ‘We really want our kids to come back to school in person, and we’re going to try- the, ”Marvin said. “I think they found they were very happy with the experience and aren’t looking for something different for next year. I also think it has to do with the pandemic, because parents really wanted their kids to go back to school for a combination of reasons. “

These reasons, Marvin said, include the fact that the staff at St. Odilia School see the child as a whole person – encompassing his academics, his life of faith, his character development, his relationships and his skills. connections.

“Our students benefit from a strong academic program here that prepares them for the next steps they take (for high school),” she said. “When their children came home from school, I think parents could not only see the difference in their children, but also feel the difference. “

No matter how you look at it, public and private schools have faced huge changes throughout the pandemic. Dan said she has been involved in public and private education for 20 years, and she will remember it last year for the rest of her life.

“I am proud of what many private and Catholic schools have done by putting children first. Children cannot stay at home for a year – they have to be with their teachers and learn. We were in person all year round and we had no more cases of COVID than schools that were taking distance education, ”Dan said. “The power of good teachers, of relationships and of being in person with each other is something that is really important and appreciated. “

St. Odilia and Hill-Murray both have waiting lists for the 2021-22 school year, but there are limited openings for certain years.


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Summer School Enrollment Up in Richmond Area – Teacher Salaries Almost Double in Some Districts | Education

Richmond and Chesterfield schools are paying teachers $ 40 an hour this summer. According to Sidney Gunter, Academic Response to Intervention Coordinator for RPS, the school system of approximately 28,000 has invited approximately 4,000 students to participate in its summer program, and approximately 800 students are on the waiting list. . She said about 3,500 students are currently enrolled.

Gunter attributes the influx of students to the last year of e-learning and parents’ desire to get their kids back to in-person teaching as soon as possible because they fell behind in virtual learning.

She said RPS is using a combination of funding, including federal CARES grants, to increase the educator pay rate, which was $ 22.18 for the summer of 2019.

“We wanted to make sure we were able to bring our best and brightest teachers back for the summer school because we knew it was going to be a tough effort,” Gunter said. “You know the teachers haven’t been in schools for a year and a half either. We wanted really enthusiastic people to come back and work with the students in person. And we know we have to make our teachers want to come back in person.

“There are still so many uncertainties with COVID and everything, so we wanted to make sure we recognize that we have appreciated their efforts.”

Likewise, in Chesterfield, which has around 60,000 students, High School Leadership Director Belinda Merriman said the hourly rate of pay for summer school teachers had been increased in recognition of the difficulties encountered during the peak of the pandemic. The school system also pays for the increase with some federal funding. Teachers who lead virtual classes or middle and high school students receive $ 110 per student instead of an hourly rate.


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Enrollment in private schools skyrocket during pandemic | New

When the COVID-19 pandemic struck, schools in Minnesota and the country found themselves in an unprecedented situation – what to do?

The distance learning model seemed to be the best way to ensure the safety of students, teachers and staff; schools were closed for the remainder of the 2020-21 school year.

While public schools have decided to maintain the distance education model at the start of the 2020-21 school year, most private schools have chosen to reintegrate their students into the classroom.

One of the first to open in Minnesota was Hill-Murray School in Maplewood, a private Catholic school for grades 6 to 12.

“Our management team worked tirelessly throughout the past summer with a lot of planning, hard work and confidence. We had the kids back to school on August 18, ”said Melissa Dan, President of Hill-Murray. “The teachers were nervous about coming back, but they took a risk and believed in us. We only stayed open all year due to their willingness to put kids first.

Dan has a son who is dating Hill-Murray. When they went to the in-person learning in August, she said she noticed a big change in him.

“The changes I saw in him from March until he could be in school every day were just amazing,” she said. “The students have never looked happier when they come back in August. Even though they had to wear masks and follow COVID guidelines, they were so happy to be with their friends again. “

Enrollment has grown at Hill-Murray over the past six years, and Dan said last year interest in the school has grown more than ever. She believes parents may not have viewed Hill-Murray as an educational option before the pandemic.

“As the public school districts did not open last fall, we had an incredible influx of people trying to enter the school in August and September. Unfortunately some of the classes were already full so we couldn’t take all the students who wanted to come, ”she said.

Why the increase in enrollment in private schools? According to the Minnesota Department of Education, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, families across the state made choices they believed were best for their students, including delaying entry to kindergarten for the youngest. Some have considered non-public options. There has been an increase in the number of parents who have chosen a private school for their children; Additionally, a 12.4% increase in kindergarten enrollment occurred between the 2019-2020 and 2020-21 school years.

Principal Vicki Marvin of St. Odilia School – a private Catholic school in Shoreview for kindergarten to grade eight students – said the school has definitely seen an increase in enrollment.

“We usually have a handful of families contacting us for registration, but last summer we had over a hundred new families in the choir,” Marvin said. “We welcomed 60 new transfer students over the summer for the 2020-21 school year and 100% of them are re-enrolled for this upcoming school year, and that’s exciting.”

Marvin also said she believes parents realize they have other educational options besides public school for their children.

“I think for some families who maybe weren’t sure whether or not to choose a private school, it was enough for them to say, ‘We really want our kids to come back to school in person, and we’re going to try- the, ”Marvin said. “I think they found they were very happy with the experience and aren’t looking for something different for next year. I also think it has to do with the pandemic, because parents really wanted their kids to go back to school for a combination of reasons. “

These reasons, Marvin said, include the fact that the staff at St. Odilia School see the child as a whole person – encompassing his academics, his life of faith, his character development, his relationships and his skills. relationships.

“Our students benefit from a strong academic program here that prepares them for the next steps they take (for high school),” she said. “When their children came home from school, I think parents could not only see the difference in their children, but also feel the difference. “

No matter how you look at it, public and private schools have faced huge changes throughout the pandemic. Dan said she has been involved in public and private education for 20 years, and she will remember it last year for the rest of her life.

“I am proud of what many private and Catholic schools have done by putting children first. Children cannot stay at home for a year – they have to be with their teachers and learn. We were in person all year round and we had no more cases of COVID than schools that were taking distance education, ”Dan said. “The power of good teachers, of relationships and of being in person with each other is something that is really important and appreciated. “

St. Odilia and Hill-Murray both have waiting lists for the 2021-22 school year, but there are limited openings for certain years.


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In-person classes this fall are likely to impact school enrollment numbers – Macomb Daily

Karen Rick is already excited about the school.

Last year, during the pandemic, she attended kindergarten at Mount Clemens Montessori School, but only because she was able to learn from her teacher face to face. If there had only been virtual lessons, her parents would have kept her at home.

“She appreciated. She had fun, ”said Karen’s father, Erik Rick of Mount Clemens, who served as chief petty officer in the United States Navy for 20 years before retiring. “The kids had to wear masks and follow other rules related to social distancing, but it actually went pretty well. They adapted very well and much faster than us adults.

But not all of the children were in school.

When coronavirus cases skyrocketed in March, tens of thousands of students disappeared from Michigan public schools.

Statewide, Michigan’s fall enrollment fell by 53,200 students, or 3.7%, according to unaudited enrollment data recently compiled by the state. That’s twice as many students as the state lost in 2009-10, the last year of the Great Recession, which was the biggest drop in over a decade.

Of the students lost in schools, 4,463 were in Macomb County. According to MI School Data, 126,679 students were enrolled in Macomb County schools in 2018-19. In 2019-2020, they were 124,910. The tally for the 2020-2021 school year was 120,464.

Local schools

According to registration data compiled by Chalkbeat and the Associated Press, all but one of Macomb County’s public schools saw their enrollment drop in the past school year.

Richmond Community Schools, which offered both in-person and virtual learning, actually gained 24 students in 2020-2021.

Six Macomb County academies saw an increase.

• Anchor Bay School District

2019-2020: 5,838

2020-2021: 5,380

• Schools in the Armada region

2019-2020: 1,784

2020-2021: 1707

• Central line public schools

2019-2020: 2531

2020-2021: 2,427

• Chippewa Valley Schools

2019-2020: 15,688

2020-2021: 14,817

• Clintondale Community Schools

2019-2020: 2,656

2020-2021: 2,525

• Eastpointe public schools

2019-2020: 2,470

2020-2021: 2332

• Fitzgerald Public Schools

2019-2020: 2,378

2020-2021: 2,273

• Fraser Public Schools

2019-2020: 4,828

2020-2021: 4,673

• Lake Shore Public Schools

2019-2020: 3,433

2020-2021: 3,162

• Lakeview Public Schools

2019-2020: 4,357

2020-2021: 4,224

• Public schools of Anse Creuse

2019-2020: 10 163

2020-2021: 9,885

• New Haven Community Schools

2019-2020: 1295

2020-2021: 1,289

• Richmond Community Schools

2019-2020: 1,464

2020-2021: 1,488

• Romeo community schools

2019-2020: 5,218

2020-2021: 5,080

• Roseville community schools

2019-2020: 4,569

2020-2021: 4,359

• South Lake Schools

2019-2020: 1,634

2020-2021: 1,539

• Utica community schools

2019-2020: 26 599

2020-2021: 25 672

• Van Dyke Public Schools

2019-2020: 2,292

2020-2021: 2046

• Warren Consolidated Schools

2019-2020: 13,506

2020-2021: 12 949

• Warren Woods Public Schools

2019-2020: 3,248

2020-2021: 3,164

Macomb County Academies:

Eaton Academy

2019-2020: 366

2020-2021: 344

Conner Creek Academy

2019-2020: 942

2020-2021: 880

Warren Academy

2019-2020: 695

2020-2021: 640

Academy of Arts in the Woods

2019-2020: 320

2020-2021: 276

Mount Clemens Montessori

2019-2020: 297

2020-2021: 269

Merritt Academy

2019-2020: 662

2020-2021: 653

Rising Star Academy

2019-2020: 121

2020-2021: 116

Macomb Academy

2019-2020: 72

2020-2021: 69

Huron Academy

2019-2020: 631

2020-2021: 632 *

Michigan Academy of Mathematics and Sciences

2019-2020: 895

2020-2021: 907 *

Macomb Montessori Academy

2019-2020: 231

2020-2021: 251

Academy of Grands Chênes

2019-2020: 748

2020-2021: 770 *

Reach the Charter Academy

2019-2020: 593

2020-2021: 623 *

Predominance academy

2019-2020: 565

2020-2021: 664 *

Detroit’s public school community district, the state’s largest, lost 2,719 students, or more than 5%, as of the October count. Superintendent Nikolai Vitti said more students have since returned to the district, and he believes the district’s numbers will eventually return to pre-pandemic levels.

“They just didn’t go to school,” he said. “Now they are slowly coming back. “

Since the start of the school year, superintendents statewide have reported that enrollment is down. The new unverified student counts give the clearest picture of the declines to date.

The numbers are still preliminary, but with such a large overall drop, updated registration data is unlikely to significantly change the situation.

What happened?

Most would agree that the numbers underscore the disruptive effect of the pandemic on the studies of thousands of students. Many parents did not want to expose their children to the coronavirus or did not want them to learn from a distance.

“I know a lot of families who were on waiting lists to enter private schools that offered in-person classes,” said Megan Blenkhorn of New Baltimore, a former teacher and member of the Mount Clemens Montessori School Board.

There were also parents who worked from home during the pandemic or were unemployed, which made home schooling possible.

According to the Michigan Department of Education, there were 45 registered / approved homeschooling sites in Macomb County and a total of 65 students were enrolled and enrolled in homeschooling.

Among the largest share of students who did not show up were kindergarten children, whose enrollments statewide fell 13,000, a drop more than twice as large as declines in the other years. Following a model that emerged nationwide this fall, many families have chosen to keep their young children in daycare or at home rather than trying to help their 5-year-old learn online.

In Detroit, preschools and first graders accounted for 75% of the decline in the city alone, according to Sarah Winchell Lenhoff, professor and researcher at Wayne State University.

“Some children will benefit from the one year delay in kindergarten, those who are a little younger and / or a little less ready to go to school. Many more won’t, ”State Superintendent Michael Rice said last spring. “Parents’ choice in a pandemic to wait a year until children can have a fuller, less choppy experience in public schools will serve some children in some schools and less well in others. schools. ”

In March, when the decline in enrollment was first reported by the Macomb Daily, Macomb Middle School District Superintendent Michael DeVault admitted the number of “lost” students was expected. “But the losses were pretty similar across the county. With families choosing home schooling, private schooling or other choices, combined with declining birth rates and student populations across the county, the numbers were doomed to go down anyway. . “

Back to normal

The good news has arrived this fall, all public schools in Macomb County will be offering in-person classes.

DeVault said preliminary comments on the districts are that they are also seeing an increase in enrollment, indicating that their kindergarten and first graders are returning.

Parents can also expect to see a lot of publicity from school districts looking to regain their enrollment numbers.

“We promote our district and our programs through our website, social media and most importantly word of mouth,” said Erik Edoff, director of public schools at L’Anse Creuse. “We were in person all school year last, and there were even fewer grade one grade 1 students than expected, but I think it’s going to bounce back this year. Each family’s perspective and reasons for sending or retaining their student are very personal and difficult to quantify. We aim to offer a variety of programs to meet the needs of families so that they can gain the best possible education.

Among the kindergarten teachers eager to see her little ones in person is Emily Jankowski from Eastpointe Community Schools.

“This will be my fourth year of teaching,” said Kindergarten teacher Crescentwood Elementary. “Because we offered face-to-face and virtual learning, our enrollment numbers were essentially the same as other years. “

But it will be good to see his class learn together rather than 17 in person and nine online.

“I’m delighted to have all of the kids back in class,” Jankowski said. “We become like a family, so it’s a good place for a child to take academic risks and grow as an individual. “

– The Associated Press contributed to this report


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National Public School Enrollment Falls 3% | New

(The Central Square) – The number of students attending public schools in the 2020-2021 school year has decreased by approximately 3% compared to the previous year.

The The data comes from the National Center for Education Statistics, a federal agency that analyzes education figures.

The 3% drop represents some 1.5 million students according to the preliminary report. A final report won’t be available until next spring, according to NCES. The figures come from reports generated by state education departments.

There were 51.1 million students enrolled in conventional and public charter schools in the 2019-2020 school year.

Even more striking is the drop in enrollments among the youngest. Preschool enrollment fell 22%, and preschool and kindergarten enrollment combined fell 13%.

In contrast, secondary school enrollment fell 0.4%.

Ross Santy, associate commissioner of NCES, pointed out how rare it is for public schools to lose students.

“Kindergarten to Grade 12 enrollment in public schools across our country has increased almost every year since the turn of this century,” Santy said in a statement. “Prior to this year, in the last few years where we have seen a drop in registrations, these were small changes representing less than 1% of total registrations. “

Some 29 states have experienced enrollment declines of between 1% and 3%. Washington, DC, Utah, South Dakota, the US Virgin Islands and American Samoa recorded declines of less than 1%.

Vermont, Mississippi and Puerto Rico all saw their registrations drop by more than 5%, while Washington, New Mexico, Michigan, Kentucky and Maine lost between 4% and 5% of registrations.

The coronavirus pandemic and government-imposed restrictions that closed schools were the main driver behind the decline in the number of public school students.

The sharp drop in enrollment among younger students confirms earlier speculation that families have chosen to keep these students out of school rather than attempt virtual learning.

Home schooling, meanwhile, more than doubled between the end of the 2019-2020 school year and the start of the 2020-2021 school year.

According to the US Census Bureau, 5.4% of US households said they would home-school their children in the spring of 2020. As of October 2020, that number had risen to 11.1%.

“It is clear that in an unprecedented environment, families are looking for solutions that will reliably meet their health and safety needs, their childcare needs, and their learning and social needs. -emotional feelings of their children, ”the Census Bureau said in a recent report.

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Summer school enrollments increase in Fresno, California after COVID-19

Summer school enrollments have increased for Fresno Unified Schools after a difficult year of distance learning caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

About 17,000 FUSD students attended the first day of summer school on Monday, the highest number in at least four years, district officials confirmed. Many parents who spoke with The Bee’s Education Lab said they were concerned that their students were falling behind academically while learning at home.

But what is called “learning loss” or “unfinished learning” is difficult to measure. Fresno Unified officials say they’re still working on a program that they believe will help determine where students are academically compared to where they should be by grade-level standards.

According to a recent survey by the Public Policy Institute of California, about 83% of parents said children fell behind academically during the pandemic, 64% said students were “seriously behind.”

Summer student Keyera Dickson said it’s easier to stay motivated with in-person learning.

“If you’re home alone you won’t get the help you need,” she said.

Dickson said that during the pandemic she usually kept her camera off because she had many distractions in her house. With the summer camp in person, she said she could get help from her teachers and fellow students.

“We were just laughing there, having a good time, but if I was online I wouldn’t even know anyone and I wouldn’t even want to turn on my camera,” Dickson said.

But parents and teachers are also trying to balance learning concerns about grades and graduation credits with the mental health needs of their students, many of whom have been traumatized after living in fear for longer. one year.

The pandemic, coupled with months of nationwide social unrest and, in California, months of wildfires that have driven people from their homes, has rekindled fears about how young people are coping. . These last months, school and health officials have issued warnings about increasing drug use and reports of self-harm among students.

Such worries led Katie Jerkovich to give her daughter a learning break by skipping summer school altogether.

“After the hell they’ve been through this year because of our advice, they 100% need a break and go back to school as usual in the fall. I will not make them suffer any more, ”said Jerkovich.

Other parents, like Erika Ireland, remain concerned about coronavirus infections even as cases continue to slow amid rising vaccination rates. She wants her son to continue learning online for now.

“I am not ready for my child to go to school in person until there is a vaccine for the children,” Ireland said. “I’m not so worried that he will get COVID as I am about the aftermath.”

But for many parents who urge their children to catch up on schoolwork, frustrations grow over FUSD summer school options, which parents say are too limited in terms of classroom space and academic opportunities.

Academies and summer camp

Distance learning remains an option for many FUSD students this summer, but district leaders have encouraged parents to enroll students in the traditional summer school.

“We are confident that the more students we can bring back to campus, the more successful they will be,” said Jeremy Ward, assistant superintendent of college and career preparation at the Education Lab. “Whether it’s filling learning gaps or getting the credits you need to graduate, it all works best in person. “

After only two days of summer camp, teachers and students reported feeling the benefits of in-person learning.

Krishnna Reyes, a Roosevelt high school teacher in vocational technical education, is working with professors from Reedley College and New Vision Aviation to teach FUSD students about aviation and engineering this summer.

Reyes said the aviation summer camp teaches children the practical application of math and the fundamentals of physics.

“You get more perspective in the math of building a rocket. I didn’t figure it out until the teacher broke the math. I couldn’t write 1/4 on a ruler. It gave me a different perspective on learning math, ”said student Zamaury Dickson.

In addition to hands-on learning, Reyes said the students bonded.

“They don’t all come from the same school. You have several high schools here and different grades, so they come out of their homes all year round. From what I see, they love it. They didn’t even know each other, but now they’re bonding, and I think that socio-emotional piece is what was missing, ”Reyes said.

Many parents remain frustrated despite more summer school options

But as Fresno Unified bolstered summer school enrollment, many parents, such as those whose children are learning English, said they remained frustrated with what they described as too few options. and poor communication from schools.

Ireland wanted her son to take bilingual immersion online classes during the summer to help him learn Spanish. But that was not an option for her because, she said, her son is getting good grades, and most of the FUSD summer courses are aimed at helping students who need to fill their learning gaps. or catch up on their graduation credits.

“Teachers need to recommend children who need summer schooling,” Ireland said.

Ireland eventually made a deal with schools to allow her son to use an online Spanish academic program, but said she remained concerned about limited space for students learning English.

“There is only one teacher teaching for the DI program,” Ireland said. “You really only have a small amount of student places available. This is the part that, as a parent, frustrates me. “

Parents like Alis Aleman have said that Fresno’s EL students have traditionally lagged behind other students in the city in terms of test scores and graduation rates, and, like many parents, she feared the pandemic do not widen this gap further. Aleman wants his daughter to attend EL summer school, but said that was not an option as the limited class size was reserved for lower performing students who need help accumulating credits.

Students classified as English learners make up 18% of the entire Fresno Unified student body, according to the Californian school dashboard.

Communication failure

Communicating with the more than 73,000 families in the district has been a huge challenge since the early days of the pandemic and remains difficult despite improvements over time, FUSD officials acknowledged.

Although the district has sent out phone messages, emails and social media posts, “communicating with students who are not in school is a challenge,” Ward said.

“It’s complicated,” he added.

But these complications compound the frustrations of at least some parents who said they tried to be proactive about summer school enrollment but struggled to get information from schools.

Parent Esmeralda Diaz said she received a call from the district informing her that her daughter was enrolled in summer school, but, said Diaz, the FUSD employee who called couldn’t tell which ones classes or even what school her child was supposed to attend.

“Even now, no one has given me concrete information,” Diaz told Ed Lab in an interview last week.

Parent Francisca Damaso said she had a similar experience trying to figure out how many days a week and exactly when her child should show up for class.

But even after those issues were resolved, Diaz said she remained unhappy with the options available to students learning English. Summer English courses would be a big help and a good place to start, she said, instead of just a few weeks.

“Because we all know the student reclassification exams take place in September and October,” Diaz said.

Damaso is also not happy with the summer academies, but believes that they are still necessary for her daughter to be successful.

Bridging academic gaps

Fresno Unified students have two options for summer school locally.

FUSD’s summer academies serve as a more study-oriented summer school that helps students recoup their graduation credits and fill certain learning gaps.

Elementary and high school students have chosen between online and in-person summer school, while all high school summer courses will be taught in person. High school students who wish to recover their credits online can do so through the JE Young program.

But as school leaders across the country scramble to help students catch up, after a year of stress and trauma, FUSD officials say their summer courses are more about helping students. to feel supported and less to get grades.

Kindergarten to Grade 8 students will not receive grades for their summer schoolwork. The goal of summer academies for these students is to help the child reach the math or reading levels at which they should be based on their grade level.

Students can enroll in summer camps and summer academies simultaneously, combining both study and fun, Ward said.

“It’s more like seeing where they are at with some really important skills and supporting those skills. “

The Education Lab is a local journalism initiative that highlights educational issues critical to the advancement of the San Joaquin Valley. It is funded by donors. Learn more about The Bee’s Education Lab on our website.

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Isabel Sophia Dieppa is the Engagement Reporter at Fresno Bee’s Education Lab. Dieppa moved to Fresno after leaving Chicago, where she worked as a freelance reporter and social media manager since graduating from Indiana University. Prior to joining The Bee, Dieppa received a grant from the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting to report on property rights in Puerto Rico. Dieppa’s writings have appeared in Remezcla, Centro de Periodismo Investigativo de Puerto Rico, Marie Claire, Bust, Bustle, Latino Rebels and PRI. Dieppa grew up in Puerto Rico and has lived in various parts of the United States. Before becoming a journalist, Dieppa was a theater artist in the city of Chicago.


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