Enrollment in private schools skyrocket during pandemic | New

When the COVID-19 pandemic struck, schools in Minnesota and the country found themselves in an unprecedented situation – what to do?

The distance learning model seemed to be the best way to ensure the safety of students, teachers and staff; schools were closed for the remainder of the 2020-21 school year.

While public schools have decided to maintain the distance education model at the start of the 2020-21 school year, most private schools have chosen to reintegrate their students into the classroom.

One of the first to open in Minnesota was Hill-Murray School in Maplewood, a private Catholic school for grades 6 to 12.

“Our management team worked tirelessly throughout the past summer with a lot of planning, hard work and confidence. We had the kids back to school on August 18, ”said Melissa Dan, President of Hill-Murray. “The teachers were nervous about coming back, but they took a risk and believed in us. We only stayed open all year due to their willingness to put kids first.

Dan has a son who is dating Hill-Murray. When they went to the in-person learning in August, she said she noticed a big change in him.

“The changes I saw in him from March until he could be in school every day were just amazing,” she said. “The students have never looked happier when they come back in August. Even though they had to wear masks and follow COVID guidelines, they were so happy to be with their friends again. “

Enrollment has grown at Hill-Murray over the past six years, and Dan said last year interest in the school has grown more than ever. She believes parents may not have viewed Hill-Murray as an educational option before the pandemic.

“As the public school districts did not open last fall, we had an incredible influx of people trying to enter the school in August and September. Unfortunately some of the classes were already full so we couldn’t take all the students who wanted to come, ”she said.

Why the increase in enrollment in private schools? According to the Minnesota Department of Education, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, families across the state made choices they believed were best for their students, including delaying entry to kindergarten for the youngest. Some have considered non-public options. There has been an increase in the number of parents who have chosen a private school for their children; Additionally, a 12.4% increase in kindergarten enrollment occurred between the 2019-2020 and 2020-21 school years.

Principal Vicki Marvin of St. Odilia School – a private Catholic school in Shoreview for kindergarten to grade eight students – said the school has definitely seen an increase in enrollment.

“We usually have a handful of families contacting us for registration, but last summer we had over a hundred new families in the choir,” Marvin said. “We welcomed 60 new transfer students over the summer for the 2020-21 school year and 100% of them are re-enrolled for this upcoming school year, and that’s exciting.”

Marvin also said she believes parents realize they have other educational options besides public school for their children.

“I think for some families who maybe weren’t sure whether or not to choose a private school, it was enough for them to say, ‘We really want our kids to come back to school in person, and we’re going to try- the, ”Marvin said. “I think they found they were very happy with the experience and aren’t looking for something different for next year. I also think it has to do with the pandemic, because parents really wanted their kids to go back to school for a combination of reasons. “

These reasons, Marvin said, include the fact that the staff at St. Odilia School see the child as a whole person – encompassing his academics, his life of faith, his character development, his relationships and his skills. relationships.

“Our students benefit from a strong academic program here that prepares them for the next steps they take (for high school),” she said. “When their children came home from school, I think parents could not only see the difference in their children, but also feel the difference. “

No matter how you look at it, public and private schools have faced huge changes throughout the pandemic. Dan said she has been involved in public and private education for 20 years, and she will remember it last year for the rest of her life.

“I am proud of what many private and Catholic schools have done by putting children first. Children cannot stay at home for a year – they have to be with their teachers and learn. We were in person all year round and we had no more cases of COVID than schools that were taking distance education, ”Dan said. “The power of good teachers, of relationships and of being in person with each other is something that is really important and appreciated. “

St. Odilia and Hill-Murray both have waiting lists for the 2021-22 school year, but there are limited openings for certain years.


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Free University Courses to Build Vermonters Skills | New

Using $ 1 million in COVID-19 relief funds, the University of Vermont plans to offer free college courses to 550 Vermonters looking to hone their skills or learn new ones to better adapt to the job market current.

“I’ve been in this field for 20 years and it’s unprecedented, completely new,” said Cynthia Belliveau, Dean of Continuing and Distance Education at the University of Vermont on Wednesday. “There aren’t any real stipulations, you just can’t be a student. It really is for everyone. It is quite remarkable. Even with yesterday’s announcement, we have 153 people signed up. So there is a need. “

The workforce skills enhancement grant will fund two courses that can count towards earning a university degree or vocational certificate program, she said. The courses cover healthcare, digital economy, leadership and management.

“We chose these three areas because of the work we have done where we see these are future and urgent career needs,” said Belliveau.

Belliveau said his department is all about being flexible with people’s lives and schedules. She recommends that interested parties register immediately. They will have a year to decide what they want to pursue and there are programs they can take to help them decide the best course of action. Many courses are distance learning with courses taking place one or two days a week.

She said employers should take note of this as well, as they can refer their employees to the program. The UVM health network was interested, as were King Arthur Flour, Outdoor Gear Exchange, Whetstone Station Brewery in Brattleboro and Cabot.

“But the biggest partner we have is (Community College of Vermont). They have their money, we have our money, they call their occupations critical, we call our high impact programs… ”she said, adding that it is possible to use both to get four free classes.

She said the pandemic has left many people looking for new careers or ways to stay relevant in their current fields. She would like this program to continue and hopes that the data collected on this will show its value.

Julia Zema, campaign manager in Manchester-based Orvis’ marketing team, said she took classes under the program a few years ago. Orvis paid for it, all she had to do was fly to Burlington from Arlington every Friday for a month or two. Online learning was not as popular back then, she said, but believes the pandemic has changed the way people think about it.

For Zema, small lessons led to bigger things.

“I liked the program so much that I’m about to graduate from UVM with my Masters in Sustainability Leadership in their Environmental Resources program,” she said.

The courses allowed her to broaden her organizational skills and knowledge of organizational tools, which helped her a lot professionally.

“I would say it’s really worth being a priority in your life,” she said. “I believe education is the best investment we can make in ourselves, and like anything else you will get what you put into it, there are so many resources that are provided throughout the course that you might not be able to cover it in the span of it, but can take it home.


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Professional qualifications: college courses in Scotland

Help boost your career with a part-time or distance professional qualification - applications are open
Help boost your career with a part-time or distance professional qualification – applications are open

After 16 unprecedented months, many people are reassessing what their future holds. Investing in your career might be the best decision you’ve ever made – and the team at Fife College are here to help, with a range of courses tailored for you that could open a new chapter in your life.

Andrew Carnegie Business School (ACBS), which is part of Fife College, offers high quality training programs in a wide range of management disciplines.

With qualifications ranging from certificate to postgraduate, the college can support organizations and individual learners at all stages of their careers with a wide range of professional development skills essential for today’s challenging business environment. hui.

Whatever type of training you are looking for, from accounting and finance to management and leadership, ACBS has a course for you.

John Phillips of Andrew Carnegie Business School said, “Now is the time to take control of your future and invest in your future career. We are now accepting applications for courses starting in September 2021, so there has never been a better time to experience the benefits of additional professional qualifications.

Calling all professionals

Whether you are currently unemployed, on leave or looking for a promotion, new qualifications can help. They could help you land a new job, get that new promotion, or provide you with additional job security in times of uncertainty. It could be the competitive edge your career is looking for, or just the development solution to help you feel confident in a fast-paced work environment.

John added: “After the pandemic, businesses and individuals will look to invest in retraining and skills development.

“Fife College can play a vital and essential role in helping individuals and businesses in our local communities build the skills needed to rebuild the economy.

“There has never been a better time to hone and update your CV, and the Andrew Carnegie Business School at Fife College is here to help. “

The Business School offers accredited professional qualifications in:

• Accounting and finance

• Human resources management, and

• Management and leadership

Qualifications range from certificate to postgraduate level and include high quality programs accredited by leading professional institutes including AAT, CMI, ILM and CIPD.

Part-time and distance courses are available, to suit your lifestyle and learning preferences.

Visit the website to find out more about the range of diplomas on offer, with training at all levels that suit you, whatever the stage of your career.


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Free University Courses to Build Vermonters Skills | New

Using $ 1 million in COVID-19 relief funds, the University of Vermont plans to offer free college courses to 550 Vermonters looking to hone their skills or learn new ones to better adapt to the job market current.

“I’ve been in this field for 20 years and it’s unprecedented, completely new,” said Cynthia Belliveau, Dean of Continuing and Distance Education at the University of Vermont on Wednesday. “There aren’t any real stipulations, you just can’t be a student. It really is for everyone. It is quite remarkable. Even with yesterday’s announcement, we have 153 people signed up. So there is a need. “

The workforce skills enhancement grant will fund two courses that can count towards earning a university degree or vocational certificate program, she said. The courses cover healthcare, digital economy, leadership and management.

“We chose these three areas because of the work we have done where we see these are future and urgent career needs,” said Belliveau.

Vermonters can register by visiting UpSkillVermont.org or by calling 1-800-639-3210.

Belliveau said his department is all about being flexible with people’s lives and schedules. She recommends that interested parties register immediately. They will have a year to decide what they want to pursue and there are programs they can take to help them decide the best course of action. Many courses are distance learning with courses taking place one or two days a week.

She said employers should take note of this as well, as they can refer their employees to the program. The UVM Health Network was interested, as were King Arthur Flour, Outdoor Gear Exchange, Whetstone Station Brewery in Brattleboro and Cabot.

“But the biggest partner we have is (Community College of Vermont). They have their money, we have our money, they call their occupations critical, we call our high impact programs… ”she said, adding that it is possible to use both to get four free courses.

She said the pandemic has left many people looking for new careers or ways to stay relevant in their current fields. She would like this program to continue and hopes the data collected on this will show its value.

Julia Zema, campaign manager in Manchester-based Orvis’ marketing team, said she took classes under the program a few years ago. Orvis paid for it, all she had to do was fly to Burlington from Arlington every Friday for a month or two. Online learning was not as popular back then, she said, but believes the pandemic has changed the way people think about it.

For Zema, small lessons led to bigger things.

“I liked the program so much that I’m about to graduate from UVM with my Masters in Sustainability Leadership in their Environmental Resources program,” she said.

The courses allowed her to broaden her organizational skills and knowledge of organizational tools, which helped her a lot professionally.

“I would say it’s really worth being a priority in your life,” she said. “I believe education is the best investment we can make in ourselves, and like anything else you will get what you put into it, there are so many resources that are provided throughout the course that you might not be able to cover it in the span of it, but can take it home.

keith.whitcomb

@ rutlandherald.com


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Essex County inmates receive recognition after completing courses at Northern Essex College

Essex County Sheriff’s Department inmates who have completed the educational programs provided by Northern Essex Community College were recently recognized in a ceremony at the Middleton House of Correction.

Jillian Nelson, deputy superintendent of the Essex County Sheriff’s Department, said advances in education prove “great things can happen in the most unexpected places.” Speaker Dennis Everett, Director of Reintegration at UTEC, highlighted his own difficult childhood due to domestic violence and multiple incarceration.

“All of my earnings wouldn’t have happened if I hadn’t done the internal work,” Everett said, asking inmates to “restore family relationships” and “forgive each other.”

The students have been recognized by Director of Education Darla Lamanna and staff at Northern Essex Community College, Spectrum Health Systems, Roca and UTEC.

Northern Essex has been offering educational programs for the Essex County Sheriff’s Department since 2019, when the college was selected through a competitive grant process. Sheriff Kevin F. Coppinger has said providing educational opportunities for inmates is a priority. “Our motto is that every obstacle is an opportunity. We want our customers to know that if something comes in front of them, they can fall forward. “

North Essex has staff at the Middleton House of Correction, including on-site educational and professional advisers, learning specialists, inmate library legal librarians and a program director. Programs include preparation courses for students taking the high school equivalency exam, three-credit college courses, and a one-week course leading to certification as a peer tutor.

Dylan Flanagan received the highest score on the HiSET test and was the class’s promotion major. Wearing a royal blue graduation cap and gown, he said: “The main thing I’ve learned is that whatever the situation, focus on the positive. Never give up because there is always a silver lining. Thank you for giving me the tools to find my good side.

Northern Essex President Lane A. Glenn spoke of a student who started taking classes at the correctional facility and moved to campus after being released mid-semester. The student is now enrolled in the college’s business management program.


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In-person classes this fall are likely to impact school enrollment numbers – Macomb Daily

Karen Rick is already excited about the school.

Last year, during the pandemic, she attended kindergarten at Mount Clemens Montessori School, but only because she was able to learn from her teacher face to face. If there had only been virtual lessons, her parents would have kept her at home.

“She appreciated. She had fun, ”said Karen’s father, Erik Rick of Mount Clemens, who served as chief petty officer in the United States Navy for 20 years before retiring. “The kids had to wear masks and follow other rules related to social distancing, but it actually went pretty well. They adapted very well and much faster than us adults.

But not all of the children were in school.

When coronavirus cases skyrocketed in March, tens of thousands of students disappeared from Michigan public schools.

Statewide, Michigan’s fall enrollment fell by 53,200 students, or 3.7%, according to unaudited enrollment data recently compiled by the state. That’s twice as many students as the state lost in 2009-10, the last year of the Great Recession, which was the biggest drop in over a decade.

Of the students lost in schools, 4,463 were in Macomb County. According to MI School Data, 126,679 students were enrolled in Macomb County schools in 2018-19. In 2019-2020, they were 124,910. The tally for the 2020-2021 school year was 120,464.

Local schools

According to registration data compiled by Chalkbeat and the Associated Press, all but one of Macomb County’s public schools saw their enrollment drop in the past school year.

Richmond Community Schools, which offered both in-person and virtual learning, actually gained 24 students in 2020-2021.

Six Macomb County academies saw an increase.

• Anchor Bay School District

2019-2020: 5,838

2020-2021: 5,380

• Schools in the Armada region

2019-2020: 1,784

2020-2021: 1707

• Central line public schools

2019-2020: 2531

2020-2021: 2,427

• Chippewa Valley Schools

2019-2020: 15,688

2020-2021: 14,817

• Clintondale Community Schools

2019-2020: 2,656

2020-2021: 2,525

• Eastpointe public schools

2019-2020: 2,470

2020-2021: 2332

• Fitzgerald Public Schools

2019-2020: 2,378

2020-2021: 2,273

• Fraser Public Schools

2019-2020: 4,828

2020-2021: 4,673

• Lake Shore Public Schools

2019-2020: 3,433

2020-2021: 3,162

• Lakeview Public Schools

2019-2020: 4,357

2020-2021: 4,224

• Public schools of Anse Creuse

2019-2020: 10 163

2020-2021: 9,885

• New Haven Community Schools

2019-2020: 1295

2020-2021: 1,289

• Richmond Community Schools

2019-2020: 1,464

2020-2021: 1,488

• Romeo community schools

2019-2020: 5,218

2020-2021: 5,080

• Roseville community schools

2019-2020: 4,569

2020-2021: 4,359

• South Lake Schools

2019-2020: 1,634

2020-2021: 1,539

• Utica community schools

2019-2020: 26 599

2020-2021: 25 672

• Van Dyke Public Schools

2019-2020: 2,292

2020-2021: 2046

• Warren Consolidated Schools

2019-2020: 13,506

2020-2021: 12 949

• Warren Woods Public Schools

2019-2020: 3,248

2020-2021: 3,164

Macomb County Academies:

Eaton Academy

2019-2020: 366

2020-2021: 344

Conner Creek Academy

2019-2020: 942

2020-2021: 880

Warren Academy

2019-2020: 695

2020-2021: 640

Academy of Arts in the Woods

2019-2020: 320

2020-2021: 276

Mount Clemens Montessori

2019-2020: 297

2020-2021: 269

Merritt Academy

2019-2020: 662

2020-2021: 653

Rising Star Academy

2019-2020: 121

2020-2021: 116

Macomb Academy

2019-2020: 72

2020-2021: 69

Huron Academy

2019-2020: 631

2020-2021: 632 *

Michigan Academy of Mathematics and Sciences

2019-2020: 895

2020-2021: 907 *

Macomb Montessori Academy

2019-2020: 231

2020-2021: 251

Academy of Grands Chênes

2019-2020: 748

2020-2021: 770 *

Reach the Charter Academy

2019-2020: 593

2020-2021: 623 *

Predominance academy

2019-2020: 565

2020-2021: 664 *

Detroit’s public school community district, the state’s largest, lost 2,719 students, or more than 5%, as of the October count. Superintendent Nikolai Vitti said more students have since returned to the district, and he believes the district’s numbers will eventually return to pre-pandemic levels.

“They just didn’t go to school,” he said. “Now they are slowly coming back. “

Since the start of the school year, superintendents statewide have reported that enrollment is down. The new unverified student counts give the clearest picture of the declines to date.

The numbers are still preliminary, but with such a large overall drop, updated registration data is unlikely to significantly change the situation.

What happened?

Most would agree that the numbers underscore the disruptive effect of the pandemic on the studies of thousands of students. Many parents did not want to expose their children to the coronavirus or did not want them to learn from a distance.

“I know a lot of families who were on waiting lists to enter private schools that offered in-person classes,” said Megan Blenkhorn of New Baltimore, a former teacher and member of the Mount Clemens Montessori School Board.

There were also parents who worked from home during the pandemic or were unemployed, which made home schooling possible.

According to the Michigan Department of Education, there were 45 registered / approved homeschooling sites in Macomb County and a total of 65 students were enrolled and enrolled in homeschooling.

Among the largest share of students who did not show up were kindergarten children, whose enrollments statewide fell 13,000, a drop more than twice as large as declines in the other years. Following a model that emerged nationwide this fall, many families have chosen to keep their young children in daycare or at home rather than trying to help their 5-year-old learn online.

In Detroit, preschools and first graders accounted for 75% of the decline in the city alone, according to Sarah Winchell Lenhoff, professor and researcher at Wayne State University.

“Some children will benefit from the one year delay in kindergarten, those who are a little younger and / or a little less ready to go to school. Many more won’t, ”State Superintendent Michael Rice said last spring. “Parents’ choice in a pandemic to wait a year until children can have a fuller, less choppy experience in public schools will serve some children in some schools and less well in others. schools. ”

In March, when the decline in enrollment was first reported by the Macomb Daily, Macomb Middle School District Superintendent Michael DeVault admitted the number of “lost” students was expected. “But the losses were pretty similar across the county. With families choosing home schooling, private schooling or other choices, combined with declining birth rates and student populations across the county, the numbers were doomed to go down anyway. . “

Back to normal

The good news has arrived this fall, all public schools in Macomb County will be offering in-person classes.

DeVault said preliminary comments on the districts are that they are also seeing an increase in enrollment, indicating that their kindergarten and first graders are returning.

Parents can also expect to see a lot of publicity from school districts looking to regain their enrollment numbers.

“We promote our district and our programs through our website, social media and most importantly word of mouth,” said Erik Edoff, director of public schools at L’Anse Creuse. “We were in person all school year last, and there were even fewer grade one grade 1 students than expected, but I think it’s going to bounce back this year. Each family’s perspective and reasons for sending or retaining their student are very personal and difficult to quantify. We aim to offer a variety of programs to meet the needs of families so that they can gain the best possible education.

Among the kindergarten teachers eager to see her little ones in person is Emily Jankowski from Eastpointe Community Schools.

“This will be my fourth year of teaching,” said Kindergarten teacher Crescentwood Elementary. “Because we offered face-to-face and virtual learning, our enrollment numbers were essentially the same as other years. “

But it will be good to see his class learn together rather than 17 in person and nine online.

“I’m delighted to have all of the kids back in class,” Jankowski said. “We become like a family, so it’s a good place for a child to take academic risks and grow as an individual. “

– The Associated Press contributed to this report


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New college courses for jobs in the green economy | Wales



The Welsh government has given £ 2million to higher education institutions to provide training for green economy jobs.

The funding is part of the Welsh Government’s Personal Learning Accounts program, which helps people in low-income jobs retrain and access longer-term skilled jobs with higher incomes.

Six colleges have received funding to deliver the courses, which will include areas such as electric and hybrid cars, eco-friendly heating systems and electric bicycles.

Classes will be open to:

  • adults over 19 who earn less than £ 26,000 per year, including employees currently on leave, or on zero-hour contracts, or whose jobs are in jeopardy; and
  • employees of companies that have identified specific training needs in these sectors.

Higher education institutions have worked with employers to develop courses that should create employment opportunities now or in the near future.

The subsidized colleges are:

  • Gower College Swansea
  • Pembrokeshire College
  • Sir Gar College
  • Grwp Llandrillo Menai
  • Cardiff and Vale College
  • Bridgend College

Welsh Education and Language Minister Jeremy Miles said: “Jobs in the green economy will continue to increase in the future, as we step up our actions to tackle climate change, such as the transition to more environmentally friendly transport. Our higher education institutions will be essential in ensuring that we have skilled workers with the expertise to meet employer demand. “

Economy Minister Vaughan Gething added: “We want to build an economy based on the principles of fair labor, sustainability and the industries and services of the future. We are committed to helping Welsh businesses thrive, grow and create the jobs of the future. , which will be very different from the jobs of the past. “

Climate Change Minister Julie James said the courses “will create new opportunities in sustainable industries and help us in our overall goal of tackling climate change.”


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School enrollment drops in Maryland; Probable cause of the pandemic

MARYLAND – A significant drop in public school enrollment nationwide could have lasting effects in Maryland, some of which could extend well beyond the pandemic.

New analysis by The Associated Press and Chalkbeat, a nonprofit news organization covering education, shows student enrollment fell last year in nearly every state in the United States, including Maryland.

Hawaii was the only exception, where registrations rose a paltry 0.2 percent.

The pandemic is probably the culprit of the sharp declines, according to the analysis of the AP.

When schools moved online during the pandemic, many parents chose to send their children elsewhere. While some took children out of public schools to home-school them, others enrolled their children in private schools, as many continued to offer in-person instruction.

Now, some school officials fear these students will never return, the AP reported. If they don’t, it’s a change that could not only affect district funding, but also change the demographics of American schools.

In Maryland, the total number of students enrolled in K-12 grades fell from 909,414 students in 2019-2020 to 882,538 in 2020-21, marking a drop of 2.96%.

Nationally, K-12 enrollments fell 2.6% in 41 states last fall, according to analysis by the AP and Chalkbeat.

In the United States, the decline was most pronounced among white students, whose enrollment fell more than 4%.

In Maryland, the largest drop was also seen among white students, with enrollment dropping 6.06%.

Here’s a look at how enrollment has changed across Maryland’s demographic groups:

  • Black students: -1.85%
  • Hispanic students: -0.61%
  • Asian American students: -0.8%
  • White students: -6.06 percent

By the numbers

At the start of the 2020-2021 school year, districts reported losing thousands of students.

Baltimore County Public Schools lost nearly 4,000 students, according to WBAL, which said the public school system in neighboring Howard County had lost nearly 2,000 students.

These weren’t the only districts where families were making alternative plans.

Montgomery County Public School Enrollment was down to more than 3,300 students, OMCP reported.

Anne Arundel County Inscription would have decreased by 1,475 students.

Registration at Harford County public schools fell by about 1,000, according to The Aegis.

Early signs show that enrollment may not fully recover, according to the AP report. A sustained drop in registrations could mean two things.

First, schools that lose students will eventually lose funding for those students.

Generally, public schools are funded on a per student basis through federal, state and local sources. Almost half of these funds come from local property taxes. Fewer students could mean an increase in property taxes to offset the decrease in funding per student.

A decline in registrations is also likely to hit the wallet in poorer neighborhoods hardest, Bruce Baker, professor of education at Rutgers University, told National Public Radio.

“If you have a district where 70, 80% of the money comes from state aid based on a certain number of registrations, which would tend to be a poorer district serving a higher share. high number of low-income and minority students, ”Baker said. said, “These districts stand to lose a lot if the state decides to follow through on using this year’s enrollment numbers as the basis for funding in the future.”

Lower kindergarten enrollment

An October 2020 report from NPR showed that enrollment declines are particularly noticeable in Kindergarten and Kindergarten – the average drop was around 16%. Another analysis from 33 states showed that about 30 percent of all K-12 enrollment declines were attributable to kindergarten.

The AP and Chalkbeat report also corroborated this.

In Maryland, kindergarten enrollments fell 10.29%.

Nationally, no state has avoided a decline in kindergarten enrollment. Some of the biggest declines were reported in other states, including Hawaii, where kindergarten enrollment fell more than 15%, and Oregon, where enrollment fell more than 14.5%.

Instead, parents choose to send their young children to charter schools or daycare centers.

The two preschool and kindergarten enrollments are down “Significantly,” Baltimore City Public Schools reported to Afro, who noted that enrollment began to decline in schools in the city before the coronavirus pandemic.

As more children deprive themselves of the academic and other benefits of kindergarten, experts say this could potentially widen educational inequities

“It all has to do with the quality of this child care environment,” Elizabeth Votruba-Drzal, a University of Pittsburgh professor who studies child care and preschool education, told Chalkbeat. “Well-off parents can buy their place in high quality settings, regardless of the constraints they face, while families with fewer resources have fewer choices and face very difficult decisions.”

– By Megan VerHelst and Elizabeth Janney


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National Public School Enrollment Falls 3% | New

(The Central Square) – The number of students attending public schools in the 2020-2021 school year has decreased by approximately 3% compared to the previous year.

The The data comes from the National Center for Education Statistics, a federal agency that analyzes education figures.

The 3% drop represents some 1.5 million students according to the preliminary report. A final report won’t be available until next spring, according to NCES. The figures come from reports generated by state education departments.

There were 51.1 million students enrolled in conventional and public charter schools in the 2019-2020 school year.

Even more striking is the drop in enrollments among the youngest. Preschool enrollment fell 22%, and preschool and kindergarten enrollment combined fell 13%.

In contrast, secondary school enrollment fell 0.4%.

Ross Santy, associate commissioner of NCES, pointed out how rare it is for public schools to lose students.

“Kindergarten to Grade 12 enrollment in public schools across our country has increased almost every year since the turn of this century,” Santy said in a statement. “Prior to this year, in the last few years where we have seen a drop in registrations, these were small changes representing less than 1% of total registrations. “

Some 29 states have experienced enrollment declines of between 1% and 3%. Washington, DC, Utah, South Dakota, the US Virgin Islands and American Samoa recorded declines of less than 1%.

Vermont, Mississippi and Puerto Rico all saw their registrations drop by more than 5%, while Washington, New Mexico, Michigan, Kentucky and Maine lost between 4% and 5% of registrations.

The coronavirus pandemic and government-imposed restrictions that closed schools were the main driver behind the decline in the number of public school students.

The sharp drop in enrollment among younger students confirms earlier speculation that families have chosen to keep these students out of school rather than attempt virtual learning.

Home schooling, meanwhile, more than doubled between the end of the 2019-2020 school year and the start of the 2020-2021 school year.

According to the US Census Bureau, 5.4% of US households said they would home-school their children in the spring of 2020. As of October 2020, that number had risen to 11.1%.

“It is clear that in an unprecedented environment, families are looking for solutions that will reliably meet their health and safety needs, their childcare needs, and their learning and social needs. -emotional feelings of their children, ”the Census Bureau said in a recent report.

One of the worst times music fans can experience is watching their favorite stars leave the stage in the middle of a gig they paid hundreds of dollars for. Unfortunately, this happens far too often. These are the musicians who left the stage in the middle of a concert … Click to find out more.


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New York Summer School Enrollment Grows Over 200,000

Enrollment in New York City’s Expanded In-Person Summer Enrichment Program for Kindergarten to Grade 12 students has exceeded the previous estimate of 200,000 students, Mayor Bill of Blasio, as schools prepare to focus less on learning gaps and more. on the transition to in-person learning.

The expanded $ 120 million summer camp-style recreational program announced in April is available to all students this year, a break from the traditional practice of requiring summer courses primarily for those who have to retake a failed course. or who need a summer course to graduate or be promoted to the next grade. The program, free for students, should be planned around the fun rather than the loss of learning that occurred during the Covid-19 pandemic, according to the teachers’ union.

The city’s education ministry said on Monday there was no capacity limit and encouraged more families to enroll in the program, which will launch on July 6.

“It is a response to the consequences of the pandemic,” said de Blasio, “but it is something that we also intend to do in the future.”

The in-person summer program is a prelude to the fall term when New York City ends distance learning, and approximately 582,000 students who have not been inside school buildings since March 2020 will have to return. But the head of the city’s teachers’ union said the summer session will not be used as a forum to prepare for the fall by identifying and addressing the degree of learning loss that the near a million students in the country’s largest school system have experienced during their absence. their classrooms.

Michael Mulgrew, president of the United Teachers’ Federation, which represents approximately 120,000 DOE employees, said the DOE informed the union that the district will focus primarily on social and emotional learning during the summer session, and not on the success gaps.

“We could have done a bit of both, but they are the ones who make the policies,” he said.

Last year, approximately 177,000 students enrolled in DOE’s distance learning program. Of this total, approximately 102,000 were to participate and 27,000 were to participate in 12-month special education programs. The department also recommended that another 48,000 students who were not at risk of repeating a year but needed extra help attend, the agency said.

A year after the start of the coronavirus pandemic, many schools are only partially open for fear of fueling the spread of the virus. Experts explain what the real risks of the spread of Covid-19 are in schools and how proper checks can change that equation. Illustration: Preston Jessee for The Wall Street Journal

The agency has yet to reveal how many attendees for this year’s summer session are expected to or will participate in special education programs. The DOE does not intend this year to recommend summer courses for students who need additional support, or to reveal how many students may have been invited by their teachers to enroll.

The recommended category was unique to last year, the agency said, because the program was entirely virtual.

“Schools have been in contact with families about student progress throughout this year and are having conversations with parents if they think a student would benefit from participating,” the agency said.

Write to Lee Hawkins at lee.hawkins@wsj.com

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Appeared in the print edition of June 29, 2021 under the title “Increase in summer school enrollment exceeds 200,000”.


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