Monthly Archives October 2021

New Milford Public School enrollments are expected to rebound in the short term and decline over time

NEW MILFORD – While the pandemic has been credited with declining enrollment in New Milford public schools at all levels, total enrollment is expected to rebound in the short term and then decline over time, according to a recent study.

In a presentation given at a recent Board of Education meeting, SLR Consulting’s Meghan McGaffin provided an analysis of current enrollments and also spoke about enrollment projections over the next decade.

The study, which looked at enrollment data throughout the 2020-21 school year, took into account factors such as population, births, employment, and city home sales.


Overall, New Milford’s population – at 28,115 – has remained stable, according to the U.S. Census. Since 2010, NM has experienced a decline of approximately 25 residents.

When it comes to jobs, the pandemic has hit the city very hard, McGaffin said.

She said historically New Milford’s unemployment rate has remained just below that of Litchfield County. According to the Connecticut Department of Labor, last year was the first in recent history where the city’s unemployment, at 7.5%, was higher than the county’s unemployment rate, which was 6.9% .

When it comes to births, data on current births is used to predict kindergarten enrollment in five years, McGaffin said.

Thanks to data received from the Connecticut Department of Public Health, births in New Milford ranged from 367 in 2004 to 238 in 2010. From 2015 to 2019, birth rates were fairly stable, averaging 243 per year.

Last year, however, the city’s birth count fell to 199, which was an “all-time low” for the community, McGaffin said.

In terms of home sales, “the COVID-19 pandemic has contributed to high selling prices in New Milford and across the state,” McGaffin said.

The number of single-family home sales in the city has gone from a low of about 200 in 2011 to a high of almost 400 last year.

In addition, there are approximately 400 future housing units in the city that are expected to become available.

The units are located in the following developments: Riverwalk by the Housatonic, 69 Lanesville Road, 189 Danbury Road and 143 West Street, 1 & 2 Bucek Lane / Poplar Street, 38-46 Lanesville Road, 64 Boardman Road and 69 Sunny Valley Road.

The majority of these developments are one or two bedroom multi-family units.

McGaffin said, however, that these types of homes often don’t “drive” new students to the area.

“These tend to be aimed at young professionals or people looking to downsize,” she said. “Your main growth drivers come from the three-bedroom units. “

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Although there was a sharp drop in school enrollment last year, that can be attributed to the pandemic, McGaffin said.

During the 2019 to 2020 school year, there were approximately 3,900 students enrolled in total from Junior Kindergarten to Grade 12, and the following school year that number dropped by about 200 students.

Elementary enrollment has remained generally stable over the past five years, while middle, middle and high school enrollment has “steadily declined,” McGaffin said.

Kindergarten enrollment in the past school year has fallen by about 50 students, which is in line with trends statewide, she added. Factors such as home schooling, private kindergartens and delayed entry all have an impact on these numbers.

According to McGaffin, birth projections, combined with housing and demographic data such as unemployment, home sales, women of childbearing age, fertility rates and population, are all factored into the projections of schooling.

The study she referred to, called Cohort Survival Methodology, draws on data from the recent past to predict the future, she said.

Persistence ratios are also used to predict future school enrollment, McGaffin said. This takes into account factors such as housing construction, residential development, economic conditions and student transfers.

“Despite the sharp decline in births last year, we expect birth rates to pick up and then rebound,” McGaffin said. “We anticipate, by 2025, some revival of recent trends from the past for your birth rate, which will then inform future kindergarten classes.”

Housing currently under development in the city is another factor used to determine future listings, she said.

“The two housing projects that are expected to impact future student enrollment will be the 150 units offered at 189 Danbury Road and 109 units at 143 West St,” she said.

About 60 students are expected to come out of these two developments. Both of these developments are in the Hill and Plain Elementary School Districts. She said, however, that these units are not expected to be occupied until around 2025.

Using district-wide forecasts, overall school enrollment in New Milford is expected to continue to decline to approximately 3,500 students (from approximately 3,700) by the 2030-2031 school year.

She added that the number of enrolled students is expected to rebound next year as home students, late-entry students and private school students return to New Milford public schools.

“We don’t anticipate any major, earth-shattering changes,” McGaffin said. “We anticipate a return to the way things had historically been in the neighborhood.”

sfox@milfordmirror.com


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New Milford Public School enrollments are expected to rebound in the short term and decline over time

NEW MILFORD – While the pandemic has been credited with declining enrollment in New Milford public schools at all levels, total enrollment is expected to rebound in the short term and then decline over time, according to a recent study.

In a presentation given at a recent Board of Education meeting, SLR Consulting’s Meghan McGaffin provided an analysis of current enrollments and also spoke about enrollment projections over the next decade.

The study, which looked at enrollment data throughout the 2020-21 school year, took into account factors such as population, births, employment, and city home sales.


Overall, New Milford’s population – at 28,115 – has remained stable, according to the U.S. Census. Since 2010, NM has experienced a decline of approximately 25 residents.

When it comes to jobs, the pandemic has hit the city very hard, McGaffin said.

She said historically New Milford’s unemployment rate has remained just below that of Litchfield County. According to the Connecticut Department of Labor, last year was the first in recent history where the city’s unemployment, at 7.5%, was higher than the county’s unemployment rate, which was 6.9% .

When it comes to births, data on current births is used to predict kindergarten enrollment in five years, McGaffin said.

Thanks to data received from the Connecticut Department of Public Health, births in New Milford ranged from 367 in 2004 to 238 in 2010. From 2015 to 2019, birth rates were fairly stable, averaging 243 per year.

Last year, however, the city’s birth count fell to 199, which was an “all-time low” for the community, McGaffin said.

In terms of home sales, “the COVID-19 pandemic has contributed to high selling prices in New Milford and across the state,” McGaffin said.

The number of single-family home sales in the city has gone from a low of about 200 in 2011 to a high of almost 400 last year.

In addition, there are approximately 400 future housing units in the city that are expected to become available.

The units are located in the following developments: Riverwalk by the Housatonic, 69 Lanesville Road, 189 Danbury Road and 143 West Street, 1 & 2 Bucek Lane / Poplar Street, 38-46 Lanesville Road, 64 Boardman Road and 69 Sunny Valley Road.

The majority of these developments are one or two bedroom multi-family units.

McGaffin said, however, that these types of homes often don’t “drive” new students to the area.

“These tend to be aimed at young professionals or people looking to downsize,” she said. “Your main growth drivers come from the three-bedroom units. “

Registration

Although there was a sharp drop in school enrollment last year, that can be attributed to the pandemic, McGaffin said.

During the 2019 to 2020 school year, there were approximately 3,900 students enrolled in total from Junior Kindergarten to Grade 12, and the following school year that number dropped by about 200 students.

Elementary enrollment has remained generally stable over the past five years, while middle, middle and high school enrollment has “steadily declined,” McGaffin said.

Kindergarten enrollment in the past school year has fallen by about 50 students, which is in line with trends statewide, she added. Factors such as home schooling, private kindergartens and delayed entry all have an impact on these numbers.

According to McGaffin, birth projections, combined with housing and demographic data such as unemployment, home sales, women of childbearing age, fertility rates and population, are all factored into the projections of schooling.

The study she referred to, called Cohort Survival Methodology, draws on data from the recent past to predict the future, she said.

Persistence ratios are also used to predict future school enrollment, McGaffin said. This takes into account factors such as housing construction, residential development, economic conditions and student transfers.

“Despite the sharp decline in births last year, we expect birth rates to pick up and then rebound,” McGaffin said. “We anticipate, by 2025, some revival of recent trends from the past for your birth rate, which will then inform future kindergarten classes.”

Housing currently under development in the city is another factor used to determine future listings, she said.

“The two housing projects that are expected to impact future student enrollment will be the 150 units offered at 189 Danbury Road and 109 units at 143 West St,” she said.

About 60 students are expected to come out of these two developments. Both of these developments are in the Hill and Plain Elementary School Districts. She said, however, that these units are not expected to be occupied until around 2025.

Using district-wide forecasts, overall school enrollment in New Milford is expected to continue to decline to approximately 3,500 students (from approximately 3,700) by the 2030-2031 school year.

She added that the number of enrolled students is expected to rebound next year as home students, late-entry students and private school students return to New Milford public schools.

“We don’t anticipate any major, earth-shattering changes,” McGaffin said. “We anticipate a return to the way things had historically been in the neighborhood.”

sfox@milfordmirror.com


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Continuing education news

The FE News Channel gives you the latest education news and updates on emerging education strategies and # The future of education and the #AvenirduTravail.

Providing reliable and positive continuing education news and perspectives since 2003, we are a digital news channel with a mix of written articles, podcasts and videos. Our specialization offers you a blend of the latest education news, our position is always positive, building the sector and sharing different perspectives and viewpoints of thought leaders, to provide you with a think tank of new ideas and solutions for bring the education sector together and come up with new innovative ideas and solutions.

FE News publishes exclusive articles on the thought leadership among the peers of our story writers, as well as user-generated content on our network of over 3,000 newsrooms, providing multiple sources of the latest education news in the world. education and employability sectors.

FE News also broadcasts live events, podcasts with leading experts and thought leaders, webinars, video interviews and continuing education newsletters so you receive the latest developments in Skills news and in the areas of learning, continuing education and employability.

Each week, FE News offers more than 200 articles and new content per week. We are a news channel providing the latest news on lifelong learning, providing insight from multiple sources on the latest developments in education policy, the latest strategies, right down to our thought leaders who provide strategy reflection on blue skies, best practices and innovation to help examine future developments. for education and the future of work.

As of January 2021, FE News had over 173,000 unique visitors according to Google Analytics and over 200 new news content each week, ranging from thought leadership articles to the latest education news via writing, podcasts, videos. and press releases from across the industry. , which places us in the UK’s top 2,000 websites.

We thought it would be helpful to explain how we prioritize our latest education news content and how you can get involved and understand how you can read the latest daily continuing education news and how we structure our content. of week FE:

main Features

Our main features are exclusive and are thought leadership articles and a reflection on the blue sky with experts writing peer-to-peer topical articles on the future of education and the future of work. The emphasis is on thought leadership focused on solutions, sharing of best practices, innovation and emerging strategy. These are often articles about the future of education and the future of work, they often then create future education news articles. We limit our core features to a maximum of 20 per week, as they often relate to new concepts and new thinking processes. Our main features are also exclusive articles responding to the latest education news, perhaps an expert’s insight on a policy announcement or a response to a report from an education think tank or a White Book.

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FE Voices was originally created as a section on FE News to give voice to the industry. As we now have over 3,000 newsrooms and contributors, FE Voices are generally thought leadership articles, they don’t have to be exclusive, but generally are, they are slightly shorter than the core features. FE Voices may include more mixed media with Continuing Education Information articles, such as podcasts and embedded videos. Our industry response articles requesting different comments and opinions on education policy announcements or responding to a white paper report are typically kept in the FE Voices section. If we have a live podcast at a party or a radio show like the SkillsWorldLive radio show the next morning we put the FE podcast recording in the FE Voices section.

Sector news

In Industry News, we have a mix of content from press releases, educational resources, reports, education research, white papers from a range of contributors. We have lots of positive news articles on education from colleges, award bodies, and apprenticeship providers, press releases from DfE to think tanks giving an overview of a report, and resources. useful to help you provide educational strategies to your learners and students.

Podcasts

We offer a range of educational podcasts on FE News, from full hour production FE podcasts such as SkillsWorldLive in conjunction with the Federation of Awarding Bodies, to weekly podcasts from experts and thought leaders, providing advice and guidance to leaders. FE News also records podcasts at conferences and events, bringing you one-on-one podcasts with education and skills experts on the latest strategies and developments.

We have over 150 education podcasts on FE News, ranging from EdTech podcasts with experts discussing Education 4.0 and how technology complements and transforms education, to podcasts with experts discussing research. in education, the future of work, how to develop skills systems for the jobs of the future to interviews with the Minister of Learning and Skills.

We record our own exclusive FE News podcasts, work with industry partners such as FAB to create weekly podcasts and daily educational podcasts, to work with industry leaders to create exclusive educational news podcasts.

Educational video interviews

FE News has over 700 FE video interviews and has been recording educational video interviews with experts for over 12 years. These are usually vox pop video interviews with education and work experts, discussing ideas and perspectives on the future of education and work.

Events

FE News offers a free events calendar to view the latest conferences, webinars and events to stay up to date with the latest education news and strategies.

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The FE Newsroom houses your content if you are a FE News contributor. It also helps the audience to develop a relationship with you as an individual or your organization as they can click and “box” consume all of your previous thought leadership articles, the latest education press releases, videos and more. educational podcasts.

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