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Target invests $ 200 million in free college courses for staff – Orange County Register

By Matthieu Boyle | Bloomberg

Target has pledged $ 200 million over four years to fund training courses for its U.S. employees, mirroring a similar program from rival Walmart and showing how far companies will go in a tight labor market.

The new program will be available to more than 340,000 full-time and part-time U.S. workers at its stores, distribution centers and corporate headquarters, Target said in a statement Wednesday. Employees can choose from 250 classes in more than 40 schools on subjects ranging from computer science to design. They will not accumulate any out-of-pocket expenses, even for textbooks and other costs. For study outside the program, Target will also pay up to $ 5,250 per year for non-master’s degrees and up to $ 10,000 for master’s degrees.

Target built the program with Guild Education, which specializes in higher education for working adults and also helped design Walmart’s tuition program. Classes will be available from the University of Arizona, Oregon State University, University of Denver, and others.

The move comes a week after Walmart softened its three-year college tuition schedule by investing $ 1 billion to remove all costs for employees – an effort to increase enrollment in a plan that previously cost $ 1 per day to employees.

Target and Walmart both hired thousands of frontline workers last year to meet the growing demand for everyday goods during the pandemic, and retailers now face the challenge of keeping them. US businesses created far fewer jobs than expected in July, indicating persistent barriers to hiring despite a more general improvement in the economy. Companies are trying to keep pace with pent-up demand, but it will take time to fill a now record number of open positions.

Target separately last week gave all of its frontline employees a $ 200 recognition bonus. Last year, he increased his starting hourly wage to $ 15, higher than Walmart’s starting wage.


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The ABCs of changing college courses if and when you want under NEP 2020

July 29 marked one year since the launch of the New Education Policy (NEP) 2020. occasion, Prime Minister Narendra Modi launched the “University Credit Bank” program which opens the way to multiple entry and exit options for higher education students. Promoted as a revolutionary reform, the Center said it would lead to a reduction in dropouts and an improvement in the enrollment rate. What this implies in the field is more flexibility for college students to choose their subjects and pursue the course they want.

What is academic credit banking?

Saying that an undergraduate degree will be 3 or 4 years in duration, NEP 2020 had considered several exit options during this period for students starting as early as the end of the first year of college. NEP said a student can earn a certificate after completing their first year in any subject, including vocational and vocational courses. Complete two years and she is eligible for a degree while a bachelor’s degree would be awarded after a 3-year program.

To this extent, the NEP had stated that an Academic Credit Bank (ABC) would be set up to “digitally store academic credits obtained from various recognized higher education institutions (HEIs) so that the degrees of an HEI may be awarded based on account credits earned “.

On July 28 of this year, the Center notified the 2021 regulation of the University Grants Commission (establishment and operation of the academic credit bank in higher education), thus officially freeing the bridges for the official launch of the initiative.

How will ABC help you?

The Center said that the ABC program will be applicable to all Indian universities at central or state level, reputable universities and autonomous colleges. A key objective of NEP 2020 is to provide flexibility to students regarding the choice of subjects as well as the prescribed trajectory for pursuing higher education.

Look at it this way: a student is entering a private lesson at a certain college. But a year later, she might find that she had better take a different path. Or, for family or financial reasons, she may not be able to continue in this college. In the normal course of things, she should give up. If she enrolls in another college, she loses a year and the fees she paid during that time. And, if she comes back to school later, even in this scenario, she wasted a year and money spent in college.

NEP 2020 offers a solution to these students by providing a “creative combination of study disciplines with multiple entry and exit points”. The idea is to “remove rigid borders and create new possibilities for students to choose and learn the subjects of their choice.”. What he further seeks to achieve is “transparent student mobility between or within” a college through a “formal system of credit recognition, credit accumulation, credit transfers and repurchase of credits ”. It is in this respect that the ABC takes all its importance.

What is the credit system?

According to the notification from the UGC, a “credit” is awarded at the end of “one hour of theory or one hour of tutorial or two hours of laboratory work, per week for a period of one semester. (13-15 weeks) giving rise to the allocation of a credit “.

The ABC now allows a system of “credit accumulation”, which must be facilitated by the opening of a

Bank account (ABA) by students in order to transfer and consolidate the credits they have acquired in the course they are pursuing. ‘Credit recognition’ involves the transfer of credits earned by students to the ABC, while ‘credit transfer’ is the process by which HEIs can receive or provide credits in a student’s ABA.

UGC has stated that credits obtained at registered higher education institutions during or after the 2021-2022 academic year alone are eligible for credit transfer, credit accumulation and credit redemption through ABC. .

How can a student use the “credit” system?

Under the credit-based system, the multiple inputs and outputs option is available at both undergraduate and master’s level. To allow multiple entry and exit from HEIs, a student’s academic path is divided into ‘levels in ascending order from level 5 to level 10 (where) level 5 represents the certificate and level 10 represents the research diploma “.

Suppose you have just enrolled in the first year of an undergraduate course. You are therefore at level 5 of the credit system. By the end of the first year, you must have accumulated 36-40 credits, which would make you eligible for an undergraduate certificate. Now, suppose you leave the course. When you are ready to return to it, you will need to enter the second year, which is level 6. For this, you must have the certificate obtained after completing the first year of the undergraduate program. If you graduate at the end of this second year, you will get a degree for which you will need 72-80 credits from levels 5 to 6, with 36-40 credits at level 6.

For the third year of your undergraduate studies, you will need to meet the entry requirements for level 7, which is the two-year degree. After completing three years of college studies, you will graduate to Level 7, which requires 108-120 credits from Levels 5-7, with 36-40 credits at Level 5, 36-40 credits at Level 6, and 36- 40 credits at level 7.

Level 8 of a bachelor’s degree course involves honors / research and requires the student to have obtained the level 7 qualifications. “After meeting the requirements for a three-year bachelor’s degree, applicants who meet a minimum GPA 7.5 will be allowed to continue their education in the fourth year of the undergraduate program to continue and complete the bachelor’s degree with research, ”UGC said.

A similar structure governs postgraduate education. UGC said that “the validity of credits earned will be for a maximum period of seven years or as specified by the ABC”.

How to open an academic bank account?

The ABA is an individual account in the ABC which must be opened and managed by a student, “into which all academic credits earned by the student in the course (s) of study are deposited, recognized, maintained, accumulated , transferred, validated or redeemed for the purpose of awarding degrees / diplomas / certificates, etc. by an awarding institution “.

The ABC is described as an academic service mechanism that takes the form of a digital or virtual or online entity established by the UGC with the approval of the Center. It will allow “students to become its academic account holders, thus paving the way for flawless student mobility”.

Regarding the side entry system or changing of course, UGC said higher education institutions can reserve places in this regard “if the student has either (has) successfully completed the first year / second year / third year of the same program at any institution, or (b) already successfully completed a first degree program and wish and

academically capable of pursuing another undergraduate program in a related subject ”.

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Free University Courses to Build Vermonters Skills | New

Using $ 1 million in COVID-19 relief funds, the University of Vermont plans to offer free college courses to 550 Vermonters looking to hone their skills or learn new ones to better adapt to the job market current.

“I’ve been in this field for 20 years and it’s unprecedented, completely new,” said Cynthia Belliveau, Dean of Continuing and Distance Education at the University of Vermont on Wednesday. “There aren’t any real stipulations, you just can’t be a student. It really is for everyone. It is quite remarkable. Even with yesterday’s announcement, we have 153 people signed up. So there is a need. “

The workforce skills enhancement grant will fund two courses that can count towards earning a university degree or vocational certificate program, she said. The courses cover healthcare, digital economy, leadership and management.

“We chose these three areas because of the work we have done where we see these are future and urgent career needs,” said Belliveau.

Belliveau said his department is all about being flexible with people’s lives and schedules. She recommends that interested parties register immediately. They will have a year to decide what they want to pursue and there are programs they can take to help them decide the best course of action. Many courses are distance learning with courses taking place one or two days a week.

She said employers should take note of this as well, as they can refer their employees to the program. The UVM health network was interested, as were King Arthur Flour, Outdoor Gear Exchange, Whetstone Station Brewery in Brattleboro and Cabot.

“But the biggest partner we have is (Community College of Vermont). They have their money, we have our money, they call their occupations critical, we call our high impact programs… ”she said, adding that it is possible to use both to get four free classes.

She said the pandemic has left many people looking for new careers or ways to stay relevant in their current fields. She would like this program to continue and hopes that the data collected on this will show its value.

Julia Zema, campaign manager in Manchester-based Orvis’ marketing team, said she took classes under the program a few years ago. Orvis paid for it, all she had to do was fly to Burlington from Arlington every Friday for a month or two. Online learning was not as popular back then, she said, but believes the pandemic has changed the way people think about it.

For Zema, small lessons led to bigger things.

“I liked the program so much that I’m about to graduate from UVM with my Masters in Sustainability Leadership in their Environmental Resources program,” she said.

The courses allowed her to broaden her organizational skills and knowledge of organizational tools, which helped her a lot professionally.

“I would say it’s really worth being a priority in your life,” she said. “I believe education is the best investment we can make in ourselves, and like anything else you will get what you put into it, there are so many resources that are provided throughout the course that you might not be able to cover it in the span of it, but can take it home.


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Professional qualifications: college courses in Scotland

Help boost your career with a part-time or distance professional qualification - applications are open
Help boost your career with a part-time or distance professional qualification – applications are open

After 16 unprecedented months, many people are reassessing what their future holds. Investing in your career might be the best decision you’ve ever made – and the team at Fife College are here to help, with a range of courses tailored for you that could open a new chapter in your life.

Andrew Carnegie Business School (ACBS), which is part of Fife College, offers high quality training programs in a wide range of management disciplines.

With qualifications ranging from certificate to postgraduate, the college can support organizations and individual learners at all stages of their careers with a wide range of professional development skills essential for today’s challenging business environment. hui.

Whatever type of training you are looking for, from accounting and finance to management and leadership, ACBS has a course for you.

John Phillips of Andrew Carnegie Business School said, “Now is the time to take control of your future and invest in your future career. We are now accepting applications for courses starting in September 2021, so there has never been a better time to experience the benefits of additional professional qualifications.

Calling all professionals

Whether you are currently unemployed, on leave or looking for a promotion, new qualifications can help. They could help you land a new job, get that new promotion, or provide you with additional job security in times of uncertainty. It could be the competitive edge your career is looking for, or just the development solution to help you feel confident in a fast-paced work environment.

John added: “After the pandemic, businesses and individuals will look to invest in retraining and skills development.

“Fife College can play a vital and essential role in helping individuals and businesses in our local communities build the skills needed to rebuild the economy.

“There has never been a better time to hone and update your CV, and the Andrew Carnegie Business School at Fife College is here to help. “

The Business School offers accredited professional qualifications in:

• Accounting and finance

• Human resources management, and

• Management and leadership

Qualifications range from certificate to postgraduate level and include high quality programs accredited by leading professional institutes including AAT, CMI, ILM and CIPD.

Part-time and distance courses are available, to suit your lifestyle and learning preferences.

Visit the website to find out more about the range of diplomas on offer, with training at all levels that suit you, whatever the stage of your career.


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Essex County inmates receive recognition after completing courses at Northern Essex College

Essex County Sheriff’s Department inmates who have completed the educational programs provided by Northern Essex Community College were recently recognized in a ceremony at the Middleton House of Correction.

Jillian Nelson, deputy superintendent of the Essex County Sheriff’s Department, said advances in education prove “great things can happen in the most unexpected places.” Speaker Dennis Everett, Director of Reintegration at UTEC, highlighted his own difficult childhood due to domestic violence and multiple incarceration.

“All of my earnings wouldn’t have happened if I hadn’t done the internal work,” Everett said, asking inmates to “restore family relationships” and “forgive each other.”

The students have been recognized by Director of Education Darla Lamanna and staff at Northern Essex Community College, Spectrum Health Systems, Roca and UTEC.

Northern Essex has been offering educational programs for the Essex County Sheriff’s Department since 2019, when the college was selected through a competitive grant process. Sheriff Kevin F. Coppinger has said providing educational opportunities for inmates is a priority. “Our motto is that every obstacle is an opportunity. We want our customers to know that if something comes in front of them, they can fall forward. “

North Essex has staff at the Middleton House of Correction, including on-site educational and professional advisers, learning specialists, inmate library legal librarians and a program director. Programs include preparation courses for students taking the high school equivalency exam, three-credit college courses, and a one-week course leading to certification as a peer tutor.

Dylan Flanagan received the highest score on the HiSET test and was the class’s promotion major. Wearing a royal blue graduation cap and gown, he said: “The main thing I’ve learned is that whatever the situation, focus on the positive. Never give up because there is always a silver lining. Thank you for giving me the tools to find my good side.

Northern Essex President Lane A. Glenn spoke of a student who started taking classes at the correctional facility and moved to campus after being released mid-semester. The student is now enrolled in the college’s business management program.


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Free University Courses to Build Vermonters Skills | New

Using $ 1 million in COVID-19 relief funds, the University of Vermont plans to offer free college courses to 550 Vermonters looking to hone their skills or learn new ones to better adapt to the job market current.

“I’ve been in this field for 20 years and it’s unprecedented, completely new,” said Cynthia Belliveau, Dean of Continuing and Distance Education at the University of Vermont on Wednesday. “There aren’t any real stipulations, you just can’t be a student. It really is for everyone. It is quite remarkable. Even with yesterday’s announcement, we have 153 people signed up. So there is a need. “

The workforce skills enhancement grant will fund two courses that can count towards earning a university degree or vocational certificate program, she said. The courses cover healthcare, digital economy, leadership and management.

“We chose these three areas because of the work we have done where we see these are future and urgent career needs,” said Belliveau.

Vermonters can register by visiting UpSkillVermont.org or by calling 1-800-639-3210.

Belliveau said his department is all about being flexible with people’s lives and schedules. She recommends that interested parties register immediately. They will have a year to decide what they want to pursue and there are programs they can take to help them decide the best course of action. Many courses are distance learning with courses taking place one or two days a week.

She said employers should take note of this as well, as they can refer their employees to the program. The UVM Health Network was interested, as were King Arthur Flour, Outdoor Gear Exchange, Whetstone Station Brewery in Brattleboro and Cabot.

“But the biggest partner we have is (Community College of Vermont). They have their money, we have our money, they call their occupations critical, we call our high impact programs… ”she said, adding that it is possible to use both to get four free courses.

She said the pandemic has left many people looking for new careers or ways to stay relevant in their current fields. She would like this program to continue and hopes the data collected on this will show its value.

Julia Zema, campaign manager in Manchester-based Orvis’ marketing team, said she took classes under the program a few years ago. Orvis paid for it, all she had to do was fly to Burlington from Arlington every Friday for a month or two. Online learning was not as popular back then, she said, but believes the pandemic has changed the way people think about it.

For Zema, small lessons led to bigger things.

“I liked the program so much that I’m about to graduate from UVM with my Masters in Sustainability Leadership in their Environmental Resources program,” she said.

The courses allowed her to broaden her organizational skills and knowledge of organizational tools, which helped her a lot professionally.

“I would say it’s really worth being a priority in your life,” she said. “I believe education is the best investment we can make in ourselves, and like anything else you will get what you put into it, there are so many resources that are provided throughout the course that you might not be able to cover it in the span of it, but can take it home.

keith.whitcomb

@ rutlandherald.com


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New college courses for jobs in the green economy | Wales



The Welsh government has given £ 2million to higher education institutions to provide training for green economy jobs.

The funding is part of the Welsh Government’s Personal Learning Accounts program, which helps people in low-income jobs retrain and access longer-term skilled jobs with higher incomes.

Six colleges have received funding to deliver the courses, which will include areas such as electric and hybrid cars, eco-friendly heating systems and electric bicycles.

Classes will be open to:

  • adults over 19 who earn less than £ 26,000 per year, including employees currently on leave, or on zero-hour contracts, or whose jobs are in jeopardy; and
  • employees of companies that have identified specific training needs in these sectors.

Higher education institutions have worked with employers to develop courses that should create employment opportunities now or in the near future.

The subsidized colleges are:

  • Gower College Swansea
  • Pembrokeshire College
  • Sir Gar College
  • Grwp Llandrillo Menai
  • Cardiff and Vale College
  • Bridgend College

Welsh Education and Language Minister Jeremy Miles said: “Jobs in the green economy will continue to increase in the future, as we step up our actions to tackle climate change, such as the transition to more environmentally friendly transport. Our higher education institutions will be essential in ensuring that we have skilled workers with the expertise to meet employer demand. “

Economy Minister Vaughan Gething added: “We want to build an economy based on the principles of fair labor, sustainability and the industries and services of the future. We are committed to helping Welsh businesses thrive, grow and create the jobs of the future. , which will be very different from the jobs of the past. “

Climate Change Minister Julie James said the courses “will create new opportunities in sustainable industries and help us in our overall goal of tackling climate change.”


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Online University Courses – Benefits and Benefits of Online Training

There are lots of reasons to consider taking online school programs. By far the best benefit of taking an online course is convenience. You will be able to take an online course from any location with an Internet connection.

online training, online school course, web school diploma

There are lots of reasons to consider taking online school programs. By far the best benefit of taking an online course is convenience. You will be able to take an online course from any location with an Internet connection. Lately, with many Wi-Fi laptops, you can connect to the Internet from almost anywhere, making online class taking much more accessible. No extra sitting in the courtyards or being locked inside. You will be able to access your online school course wherever you are.

A lot of people don’t think that they will find the time to get an academic qualification with their various commitments. Taking an online school course can be the answer to this inconvenience. You don’t have the same set schedule for taking classes while you take an online school course. You can study at your own pace and at a time that is convenient for you. It doesn’t matter whether you want to do all your schoolwork in the evenings or on the weekends, with an online school course you can do exactly what you need to do.

Most of the institutes that offer an online course do not set any deadline for you to complete the course. This implies that you can take as long as you want. When you find out that you can’t study for a few days, weeks, and even months, it’s okay if you find yourself learning your course online. You just start learning all over again whenever you are ready.

Another good thing about taking an online school course is that many of them wouldn’t have a proper exam which is important to take at the end. Most programs are awarded primarily on the basis of grades obtained in assignments throughout the course. Nonetheless, if the course you just want to take requires you to simply pass a supervised exam to qualify, then you can give yourself a time and place to get yourself swimsuit.

There is no age limit for people who need to take an online school course. This is ideal for more mature students who don’t like the idea of ​​going back to college and being surrounded by students who are half their age. So if you’re 18 or 80, you can take an online course and get the degree you’ve always wanted. You are assigned a private tutor who is accessible who will help you with questions and allow you to work through your homework and can mark your school course online or by posting whenever you want. Some programs even offer services for college students to talk to others taking the course online to alternate concepts and provide assistance.


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Students choose to take college courses during the summer – Scot Scoop News

Summer college courses have many benefits, but they can be very rigorous. Undaunted by difficult courses, many students choose to take these courses to explore their interests and begin their college journey.

“I always think it’s good to broaden your horizons. So classes are a good way to do it, ”said Anna Feng, a student who took summer school in high school.

These summer courses are also called simultaneous registration. During the summer, students can choose to take concurrent enrollment courses at local community colleges.

This program offers many courses, some of which are not offered at Carlmont. The expansion of courses gives students the opportunity to learn concepts outside of those offered by their high school and to extend their education outside of the typical school year.

“I wanted to learn more about topics that I didn’t know much about and that seemed really interesting. So I took classes to explore other topics and figure out what career I wanted to get into. It’s also a good way to understand the college environment, ”said Ryan Ng, a Carlmont junior.

These courses are great ways to explore one’s interests and they persist throughout each student’s academic career. This can be a good thing because colleges can view these courses as indicators of maturity. However, failing one of these classes has repercussions. A unsuccessful student will have to start university with the grade he obtained from taking these courses.

“You have to understand that if you take a course in college, the grade you get will stay on your transcript,” said Mayra Arellano, director of high school transition and dual enrollment.

Many students take these courses to earn college credit. College credits can be useful at the next level, and some students may even skip a course. However, they are only useful in certain situations. If you don’t know what your specialty is, it might not be worth taking courses for that reason alone.

“The human biology course I took actually didn’t count for nothing,” Feng said. an idea of ​​what you want to study. Check if this college course will satisfy him or not.

Some students take these courses to skip a class. For some secondary school subjects, the prerequisite requires attendance in previous classes. Students can try to work around this problem by taking the previous course over the summer and entering the next level. However, you have to be wary as summer courses only last six weeks and they may not have enough time to process all the information.

“This is one of the concerns we always raise when students decide to take this route. Basically, you condense a one-year course into six weeks. When this happens, their summer instructors can skip a unit or chapter, ”said Matthew Ledesma, Carlmont school counselor.

Due to the shortened schedule, these lessons are very difficult. They are taught as university courses as opposed to high school ones. It is essential to understand the difficulty that accompanies these courses.

“The calendar is not like [high] school. You only go to class a few times a week, and those are very long hours. It’s weird because you’re more in a college environment, and no matter how old you are, they treat you like an adult. So you are personally responsible for much of your work, ”said Ng.

With increased responsibility comes challenges, but it also prepares students for college. During these courses, students will be expected to acclimatize to a college environment and teaching style. They may have to attend long conferences or large projects such as writing a thesis.

“The first day, when I walked in, I had no idea that the classes were going to last three hours. On paper it doesn’t look so bad, but in person it feels a lot longer than it actually is, ”Feng said. “I was in first grade at the time, so I was really overwhelmed.

Being overwhelmed and not being prepared for the course material is a stressor that many students may face when attempting the course. To some, these drawbacks seem great. However, colleges offering these courses understand the challenge and can provide students with the resources they need to enrich their minds while enjoying a relaxing summer.

“We give a lot of support to College Canada. We really want to help our high school students understand and explore what they want to specialize in, what interests them, ”said Arellano.


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Emails: Some Kansas University Courses on Critical Race Theory

University officials told the Kansas Board of Regents that few courses offer explicit instruction in Critical Race Theory (CRT), but some professors include elements of it in discussions of race and fairness. emails obtained Wednesday by The Star show.

Board of Regents CEO Blake Flanders asked last week that the state’s six public universities – including the University of Kansas, Kansas State University, and Wichita State University – provide the information in response to a question about Critical Race Theory of Senator Brenda Dietrich, a Republican from Topeka.

Critical Race Theory is a decades-old academic concept that researchers say seeks to provide a lens for examining the impact of race and inequality on criminal justice, law, health care, housing and other essential American institutions.

Dietrch’s question came as Republicans across the country grasped critical race theory as a threat to mainstream understanding of American history. Some educational groups and professors have condemned the request, saying it could hamper academic freedom.

Legislatures across the country have pursued bills to limit the teaching of CRT in public education. While the Kansas legislature has not addressed the issue this year, lawmakers in Missouri have pushed for legislation to ban programs seen by Republicans as CRT. Dietrich said she had no problem with CRT in Kansas schools, but wanted more information to give to voters.

Responses emailed to the Board of Regents show that most schools interpreted the request narrowly. They reported little or no course with descriptions including critical breed theory or gave general answers with little detail.

“I don’t think we have classes specifically on critical race theory,” wrote Charles Taber, Dean and Executive Vice President of Kansas State University.

Taber CRT.PNG
In an email, Kansas State University rector Charles Taber wrote that the university does not have a critical race theory course.

University of Kansas assistant vice-president for academic affairs Jean Redeker named only one course, Contemporary Japanese Cinema. Redeker pointed out in his response that the course examines how critical race theory influences filmmaking and film criticism as opposed to US-focused theory teaching.

Wichita State University executive vice president and acting provost Shirley Lefever said students can take courses “that introduce them to a myriad of concepts surrounding race and discrimination, including critical theory of race to help them learn more about the world around us ”.

Pittsburg State University has gone further than other schools and provided unattributed quotes from faculty describing how elements of critical race theory are incorporated into teaching.

“We teach diversity issues in all of our classes. It’s infused into the curriculum, ”a response said before listing examples such as the discussion of redlining, discrimination, and medical experiments performed on black Americans.

“I don’t officially teach the concept of critical race theory; However, I am discussing the role played by societal structures, class and race in maintaining the social hierarchy, ”said another response.

Pittsburg, who forwarded the request directly to faculty members, identified 11 courses that included “a critical element of race theory.”

Antonio Byrd, an English professor at the University of Missouri-Kansas City who focuses on black literature, said it would be difficult to get a full account of where and how the CRT is taught in any college.

“How exactly do you define the teaching of critical race theory?” Byrd said. “Is it an entire class for 16 weeks or is it a unit where a professor, say in sociology, teaches race and racism for three weeks?” “

Byrd said CRT can manifest itself in a number of ways, from full law school courses to less formal instructions and discussions about the impact of race in particular areas.

How well those conversations should permeate the classroom, Byrd said, remains the subject of debate in universities.

“Even in higher education, it can be difficult to start conversations about race and racism,” he said. “There is a bit of disagreement if there is even a recognition that we have to teach racing in different disciplines.”

When the request became public last week, Board of Regents spokesman Matt Keith said the council frequently received requests for information from lawmakers on a wide range of topics.

E-mails show that Flanders on June 1 asked Daniel Archer, vice-president of academic affairs at the Council of Regents, to “probe the provosts” and “ask what offers expose students to this theory”.

When Archer emailed the provosts 30 minutes later, he placed the request in the context of legislative action on critical race theory, noting that several states have passed or introduced bills banning the teaching of critical race theory in public schools and colleges.

“Although there has been no bill in Kansas on this subject this year, we have received a legislative inquiry into whether this is taught at public universities,” Archer wrote. “Can you tell me if this is taught on your campus?” “

Archer CRT.PNG
Excerpt from an email from Daniel Archer of the Kansas Board of Regents to university presidents requesting information on teaching critical breed theory.

Some faculty advocates say the question was inappropriate.

“We are seeing a widespread movement this year to suppress teaching about oppression and race,” Gwendolyn Bradley, spokesperson for the American Association for University Presidents, said in an email Friday.

Chase Billingham, associate professor of sociology at Wichita State University, posted on Facebook a letter he said he wrote to university administrators. He called the request a “flagrant violation of the fundamental principles of academic freedom”.

In an interview on Wednesday, Billingham said he was pleased with the response from the administrators of the regent institutions.

“Curriculum decisions about what to include in university courses should be made by the faculty members who create and teach those courses and I hope (the university’s responses) will settle the matter. question once and for all, ”Billingham said.

“My main concern would be whether this was a stepping stone to this more aggressive action and I really hope it isn’t.”

This story was originally published June 9, 2021 at 12:32 pm.

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Katie Bernard covers the Kansas Legislature and State Government for the Kansas City Star. She joined The Star as a late-breaking journalist in May 2019 before joining the political team in December 2020. Katie studied journalism and political science at the University of Kansas.


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