All Posts By John A. Holland

New Milford Public School enrollments are expected to rebound in the short term and decline over time

NEW MILFORD – While the pandemic has been credited with declining enrollment in New Milford public schools at all levels, total enrollment is expected to rebound in the short term and then decline over time, according to a recent study.

In a presentation given at a recent Board of Education meeting, SLR Consulting’s Meghan McGaffin provided an analysis of current enrollments and also spoke about enrollment projections over the next decade.

The study, which looked at enrollment data throughout the 2020-21 school year, took into account factors such as population, births, employment, and city home sales.


Overall, New Milford’s population – at 28,115 – has remained stable, according to the U.S. Census. Since 2010, NM has experienced a decline of approximately 25 residents.

When it comes to jobs, the pandemic has hit the city very hard, McGaffin said.

She said historically New Milford’s unemployment rate has remained just below that of Litchfield County. According to the Connecticut Department of Labor, last year was the first in recent history where the city’s unemployment, at 7.5%, was higher than the county’s unemployment rate, which was 6.9% .

When it comes to births, data on current births is used to predict kindergarten enrollment in five years, McGaffin said.

Thanks to data received from the Connecticut Department of Public Health, births in New Milford ranged from 367 in 2004 to 238 in 2010. From 2015 to 2019, birth rates were fairly stable, averaging 243 per year.

Last year, however, the city’s birth count fell to 199, which was an “all-time low” for the community, McGaffin said.

In terms of home sales, “the COVID-19 pandemic has contributed to high selling prices in New Milford and across the state,” McGaffin said.

The number of single-family home sales in the city has gone from a low of about 200 in 2011 to a high of almost 400 last year.

In addition, there are approximately 400 future housing units in the city that are expected to become available.

The units are located in the following developments: Riverwalk by the Housatonic, 69 Lanesville Road, 189 Danbury Road and 143 West Street, 1 & 2 Bucek Lane / Poplar Street, 38-46 Lanesville Road, 64 Boardman Road and 69 Sunny Valley Road.

The majority of these developments are one or two bedroom multi-family units.

McGaffin said, however, that these types of homes often don’t “drive” new students to the area.

“These tend to be aimed at young professionals or people looking to downsize,” she said. “Your main growth drivers come from the three-bedroom units. “

Registration

Although there was a sharp drop in school enrollment last year, that can be attributed to the pandemic, McGaffin said.

During the 2019 to 2020 school year, there were approximately 3,900 students enrolled in total from Junior Kindergarten to Grade 12, and the following school year that number dropped by about 200 students.

Elementary enrollment has remained generally stable over the past five years, while middle, middle and high school enrollment has “steadily declined,” McGaffin said.

Kindergarten enrollment in the past school year has fallen by about 50 students, which is in line with trends statewide, she added. Factors such as home schooling, private kindergartens and delayed entry all have an impact on these numbers.

According to McGaffin, birth projections, combined with housing and demographic data such as unemployment, home sales, women of childbearing age, fertility rates and population, are all factored into the projections of schooling.

The study she referred to, called Cohort Survival Methodology, draws on data from the recent past to predict the future, she said.

Persistence ratios are also used to predict future school enrollment, McGaffin said. This takes into account factors such as housing construction, residential development, economic conditions and student transfers.

“Despite the sharp decline in births last year, we expect birth rates to pick up and then rebound,” McGaffin said. “We anticipate, by 2025, some revival of recent trends from the past for your birth rate, which will then inform future kindergarten classes.”

Housing currently under development in the city is another factor used to determine future listings, she said.

“The two housing projects that are expected to impact future student enrollment will be the 150 units offered at 189 Danbury Road and 109 units at 143 West St,” she said.

About 60 students are expected to come out of these two developments. Both of these developments are in the Hill and Plain Elementary School Districts. She said, however, that these units are not expected to be occupied until around 2025.

Using district-wide forecasts, overall school enrollment in New Milford is expected to continue to decline to approximately 3,500 students (from approximately 3,700) by the 2030-2031 school year.

She added that the number of enrolled students is expected to rebound next year as home students, late-entry students and private school students return to New Milford public schools.

“We don’t anticipate any major, earth-shattering changes,” McGaffin said. “We anticipate a return to the way things had historically been in the neighborhood.”

sfox@milfordmirror.com


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New Milford Public School enrollments are expected to rebound in the short term and decline over time

NEW MILFORD – While the pandemic has been credited with declining enrollment in New Milford public schools at all levels, total enrollment is expected to rebound in the short term and then decline over time, according to a recent study.

In a presentation given at a recent Board of Education meeting, SLR Consulting’s Meghan McGaffin provided an analysis of current enrollments and also spoke about enrollment projections over the next decade.

The study, which looked at enrollment data throughout the 2020-21 school year, took into account factors such as population, births, employment, and city home sales.


Overall, New Milford’s population – at 28,115 – has remained stable, according to the U.S. Census. Since 2010, NM has experienced a decline of approximately 25 residents.

When it comes to jobs, the pandemic has hit the city very hard, McGaffin said.

She said historically New Milford’s unemployment rate has remained just below that of Litchfield County. According to the Connecticut Department of Labor, last year was the first in recent history where the city’s unemployment, at 7.5%, was higher than the county’s unemployment rate, which was 6.9% .

When it comes to births, data on current births is used to predict kindergarten enrollment in five years, McGaffin said.

Thanks to data received from the Connecticut Department of Public Health, births in New Milford ranged from 367 in 2004 to 238 in 2010. From 2015 to 2019, birth rates were fairly stable, averaging 243 per year.

Last year, however, the city’s birth count fell to 199, which was an “all-time low” for the community, McGaffin said.

In terms of home sales, “the COVID-19 pandemic has contributed to high selling prices in New Milford and across the state,” McGaffin said.

The number of single-family home sales in the city has gone from a low of about 200 in 2011 to a high of almost 400 last year.

In addition, there are approximately 400 future housing units in the city that are expected to become available.

The units are located in the following developments: Riverwalk by the Housatonic, 69 Lanesville Road, 189 Danbury Road and 143 West Street, 1 & 2 Bucek Lane / Poplar Street, 38-46 Lanesville Road, 64 Boardman Road and 69 Sunny Valley Road.

The majority of these developments are one or two bedroom multi-family units.

McGaffin said, however, that these types of homes often don’t “drive” new students to the area.

“These tend to be aimed at young professionals or people looking to downsize,” she said. “Your main growth drivers come from the three-bedroom units. “

Registration

Although there was a sharp drop in school enrollment last year, that can be attributed to the pandemic, McGaffin said.

During the 2019 to 2020 school year, there were approximately 3,900 students enrolled in total from Junior Kindergarten to Grade 12, and the following school year that number dropped by about 200 students.

Elementary enrollment has remained generally stable over the past five years, while middle, middle and high school enrollment has “steadily declined,” McGaffin said.

Kindergarten enrollment in the past school year has fallen by about 50 students, which is in line with trends statewide, she added. Factors such as home schooling, private kindergartens and delayed entry all have an impact on these numbers.

According to McGaffin, birth projections, combined with housing and demographic data such as unemployment, home sales, women of childbearing age, fertility rates and population, are all factored into the projections of schooling.

The study she referred to, called Cohort Survival Methodology, draws on data from the recent past to predict the future, she said.

Persistence ratios are also used to predict future school enrollment, McGaffin said. This takes into account factors such as housing construction, residential development, economic conditions and student transfers.

“Despite the sharp decline in births last year, we expect birth rates to pick up and then rebound,” McGaffin said. “We anticipate, by 2025, some revival of recent trends from the past for your birth rate, which will then inform future kindergarten classes.”

Housing currently under development in the city is another factor used to determine future listings, she said.

“The two housing projects that are expected to impact future student enrollment will be the 150 units offered at 189 Danbury Road and 109 units at 143 West St,” she said.

About 60 students are expected to come out of these two developments. Both of these developments are in the Hill and Plain Elementary School Districts. She said, however, that these units are not expected to be occupied until around 2025.

Using district-wide forecasts, overall school enrollment in New Milford is expected to continue to decline to approximately 3,500 students (from approximately 3,700) by the 2030-2031 school year.

She added that the number of enrolled students is expected to rebound next year as home students, late-entry students and private school students return to New Milford public schools.

“We don’t anticipate any major, earth-shattering changes,” McGaffin said. “We anticipate a return to the way things had historically been in the neighborhood.”

sfox@milfordmirror.com


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More students than ever are choosing Green Energy College courses

Continuing education news

The FE News Channel gives you the latest education news and updates on emerging education strategies and # The future of education and the #AvenirduTravail.

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The number of first year students at UL Lafayette is increasing; higher school enrollment

LAFAYETTE, Louisiana – The number of freshmen at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette has increased by more than 15%.

A total of 2,693 freshmen are enrolled at UL Lafayette for the fall 2021 semester. That’s up from 2,338 last fall and marks a 15.2% increase, noted Dr. DeWayne Bowie. , vice-president of registration management.

“More and more freshmen are choosing UL Lafayette because of the University’s solid reputation for providing exceptional educational experiences and opportunities in a close-knit and friendly community,” said Bowie.

“Small class sizes, one-on-one instruction, affordability, and nationally-ranked academic programs are some of the reasons students choose to pursue their dreams here,” he added.

UL Lafayette released registration data for fall 2021 on Wednesday.

The rise in the number of first-time freshmen is one of several areas of enrollment growth the University has seen at the start of the new academic year compared to last fall. Among these are:

a 5.7% increase in the number of high school juniors and seniors who are double enrolled in university and who earn college credits while still in high school;
a 4.4% increase in the number of students transferred to UL Lafayette from other colleges and universities; and
a 3.9% increase in enrollment in graduate studies.

A total of 2,525 graduate students are enrolled this fall, up 95 from fall 2020.

The number of students pursuing masters and doctorates has increased by 66% in five years, noted Dr. Mary Farmer-Kaiser, Dean of the Graduate School. UL Lafayette had 1,521 graduate students in the fall of 2016.

Farmer-Kaiser attributed the leap to the growth in online delivery of the MBA program, the high retention rates in the University’s nearly 50 master’s and doctoral programs, the creation of new study programs. graduate and further expansion into online and executive formats.

In the past year, UL Lafayette introduced an online option for Louisiana’s only master’s degree in computer science program and the state’s only master’s degree in industrial chemistry. A new graduate certificate program in population health will begin in spring 2021.

“The enrollment growth that we continue to see reflects an institutional commitment to graduate studies. It’s also a testament to the quality and resilience of the graduate students who enroll here and the faculty members who are completely dedicated to their success, ”said Farmer-Kaiser.

UL Lafayette has 13,700 undergraduate students this semester, which, combined with the total of graduate studies, brings the number of degree-seeking students to 16,225 students. That’s 225 students less than the fall 2020 semester and a drop of 1.4%.

“Students who continue remain a challenge,” Bowie explained. “While our overall retention rate is at an all time high, the smaller consecutive freshman classes several years ago resulted in fewer continuing students.

“We have also had record breaking classes over the last few years at university. These two factors have affected our enrollment in the pursuit of a degree, ”he said.

However, 2,978 additional uncredited students bring UL Lafayette’s overall enrollment to 19,203. This is 25 more students than last fall.

Non-credit students include those taking professional development and training courses and continuing education courses.

Louisiana’s public colleges and universities register full-time and part-time students on the 14th day of class of each fall semester, Bowie explained. Totals are reported to the Louisiana Board of Regents and, in the case of UL Lafayette, to the University of Louisiana system as well.

“The census compiles enrollment totals, but it also provides the University with an overview of who our students are,” he said.

For example, the fall 2021 census shows that the number of black students at UL Lafayette increased 7.6% from last fall. Black students now make up nearly 22% of the student body.

Students come from 63 parishes in Louisiana; 48 states, US possessions and the District of Columbia; and 87 international countries.

Photo caption: UL Lafayette released enrollment figures for fall 2021 on Wednesday (Photo credit: Doug Dugas / University of Louisiana at Lafayette)


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UL Lafayette sees increase in freshmen and graduate enrollments

UL Lafayette says the number of freshmen at the university has increased with the number of graduate enrollments for the fall semester of 2021.

According to data released by the university on Wednesday, the number of freshmen has increased by more than 15%.

A total of 2,693 freshmen are enrolled at UL Lafayette for the fall 2021 semester. That’s up from 2,338 last fall and marks a 15.2% increase, noted Dr. DeWayne Bowie. , vice-president of registration management.

“More and more freshmen are choosing UL Lafayette because of the University’s solid reputation for providing exceptional educational experiences and opportunities in a close-knit and friendly community,” said Bowie. “Small class sizes, one-on-one instruction, affordability, and nationally ranked academic programs are among the reasons students choose to pursue their dreams here.”

UL Lafayette released registration data for fall 2021 on Wednesday. Some of this data highlights the following:

  • a 5.7% increase in the number of high school juniors and seniors who are double enrolled in university and who earn college credits while still in high school;
  • a 4.4% increase in the number of students transferred to UL Lafayette from other colleges and universities; and
  • a 3.9% increase in enrollment in graduate studies.

UL Lafayette reports that a total of 2,525 graduate students are enrolled this fall, up 95 from fall 2020.

The number of students pursuing masters and doctorates has increased by 66% in five years, according to Dr. Mary Farmer-Kaiser, dean of the Graduate School.

UL Lafayette had 1,521 graduate students in the fall of 2016.

The university attributes the increase to the growth in online delivery of the MBA program, high retention rates in the nearly 50 master’s and doctoral programs at the University, the creation of new degree programs. graduate studies and further expansion into online and executive formats.

“The enrollment growth that we continue to see reflects an institutional commitment to graduate studies. It’s also a testament to the quality and resilience of the graduate students who enroll here and the faculty members who are completely dedicated to their success, ”said Farmer-Kaiser.

UL Lafayette has 13,700 undergraduate students this semester. When combined with the total of graduate studies, this enrollment jumps to 16,225 students.

That’s 225 students less than the fall 2020 semester and a drop of 1.4%, according to UL Lafayette.

“Students who continue remain a challenge,” Bowie explained. “While our overall retention rate is at an all time high, the smaller consecutive freshman classes several years ago resulted in fewer continuing students. We have also had record breaking classes in recent academic years. Both factors affected our enrollment in the pursuit of a diploma. “

2,978 additional uncredited students bring UL Lafayette’s overall enrollment to 19,203. This is 25 more students than last fall. The university reports that uncredited students include those taking professional development and training courses and continuing education courses.

The UL says its fall 2021 census, which is taken on the 14th day of class of each fall semester and is reported to the Board of Regents and the University of Louisiana system, showed that the number of black students at UL Lafayette are up 7.6% from last fall. . Black students now make up nearly 22% of the student body, they say.

The students represent 63 parishes in Louisiana; 48 states, US possessions and the District of Columbia; and 87 international countries.

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Number of first year students on the rise; enrollment in graduate studies is increasing

The number of freshmen at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette has increased by more than 15%.

A total of 2,693 freshmen are enrolled at UL Lafayette for the fall 2021 semester. That’s up from 2,338 last fall and marks a 15.2% increase, noted Dr. DeWayne Bowie. , vice-president of registration management.

“More and more freshmen are choosing UL Lafayette because of the University’s solid reputation for providing exceptional educational experiences and opportunities in a close-knit and friendly community,” said Bowie.

“Small class sizes, individualized instruction, affordability, and nationally ranked academic programs are among the reasons students choose to pursue their dreams here,” he added.

UL Lafayette released registration data for fall 2021 on Wednesday.

The rise in the number of first-time freshmen is among several areas of enrollment growth the University has seen at the start of the new academic year compared to last fall. Among these are:

  • a 5.7% increase in the number of high school juniors and seniors who are double enrolled in university and who earn college credits while still in high school;

  • a 4.4% increase in the number of students transferred to UL Lafayette from other colleges and universities; and

  • a 3.9% increase in enrollment in graduate studies.

A total of 2,525 graduate students are enrolled this fall, up 95 from fall 2020.

The number of students pursuing masters and doctorates has increased by 66% in five years, noted Dr. Mary Farmer-Kaiser, Dean of the Graduate School. UL Lafayette had 1,521 graduate students in the fall of 2016.

Farmer-Kaiser attributed the leap to the growth in online delivery of the MBA program, the high retention rates in the University’s nearly 50 master’s and doctoral programs, the creation of new study programs. graduate and further expansion into online and executive formats.

In the past year, UL Lafayette introduced an online option for Louisiana’s only master’s degree in computer science program and the state’s only master’s degree in industrial chemistry. A new graduate certificate program in population health will begin in spring 2021.

“The enrollment growth that we continue to see reflects an institutional commitment to graduate studies. It’s also a testament to the quality and resilience of the graduate students who enroll here and the faculty members who are completely dedicated to their success, ”said Farmer-Kaiser.

UL Lafayette has 13,700 undergraduate students this semester, which, combined with the total of graduate studies, brings the number of degree-seeking students to 16,225 students. That’s 225 students less than the fall 2020 semester and a drop of 1.4%.

“Students who continue remain a challenge,” Bowie explained. “While our overall retention rate is at an all time high, the smaller consecutive freshman classes several years ago resulted in fewer continuing students.

“We have also had record breaking classes over the last few years at university. These two factors have affected our enrollment in the pursuit of a degree, ”he said.

However, 2,978 additional uncredited students bring UL Lafayette’s overall enrollment to 19,203. This is 25 more students than last fall.

Non-credit students include those taking professional development and training courses and continuing education courses.

Louisiana’s public colleges and universities register full-time and part-time students on the 14th day of class of each fall semester, Bowie explained. Totals are reported to the Louisiana Board of Regents and, in the case of UL Lafayette, to the University of Louisiana system as well.

“The census compiles enrollment totals, but it also provides the University with an overview of who our students are,” he said.

For example, the fall 2021 census shows that the number of black students at UL Lafayette increased 7.6% from last fall. Black students now make up nearly 22% of the student body.

Students come from 63 parishes in Louisiana; 48 states, US possessions and the District of Columbia; and 87 international countries.

Photo caption: UL Lafayette published the registration figures for fall 2021 on Wednesday. (Photo credit: Doug Dugas / University of Louisiana at Lafayette)


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New Foothill College Courses Target Nannies and Prospective Teachers | Schools

Foothill College is entering its fall term this week with a new offering – the Family and Nannies Studies Program.

Nicole Kerbey, child development instructor and department chair, said the Family and Nanny Studies program, created in collaboration with the Institute for Families and Nannies, is unique in that it allows professional nannies to defend themselves by pursuing a formal education.

“We don’t know of any other courses offered by an accredited college,” she said. “Families in our area frequently employ nannies and we think they will appreciate specific training for their employees. “

Kerbey said the college has offered courses, certificates and diplomas in child development and early childhood education for years, and while they don’t rule out nannies, the new courses communication and self-reflection for nannies, home program and home safety and nutrition for young children – are tailored specifically to them. With the three new courses, in addition to those already available, the global program offers comprehensive training for nannies.

“Currently, these three new courses can be used for an associate degree in arts in child development, and we also hope to offer a specific certificate of achievement in nanny and family studies soon,” Kerbey said.

Kristen Davis, who developed the nanny and family curriculum and will co-teach the classes, said that a successful nanny-parent-child relationship often involves people from different backgrounds who may have different backgrounds. different value systems and personal or cultural backgrounds.

“Practice articulating some of these goals and values, and the rationale for ‘practice’ – what the nanny does and why or how she supports the healthy growth and development of the child in a number of areas – being able to talk about these aspects of the job prepares everyone involved in the care of the child to communicate with each other from a caring and informed perspective, ”said Davis.

Child development instructor Jennifer Perez said Foothill’s approach is to elevate the nanny profession. Early childhood education in California has traditionally focused on preparing educators to teach in center-based programs such as Kindergarten and Transitional Kindergarten.

“This (program) is specifically designed for the nanny practitioner around partnering with families on various approaches to early care and education,” Perez said. “Our goal is to increase the visibility of the specialized practice that nannies bring to their work with families and young children at home. “

Teacher’s course

Kerbey introduced another new offering to Foothill: his Introductory Elementary Education course as part of his AA-T Elementary Teacher Education Diploma. Students will be able to begin their courses at Foothill and in less than two years complete their lower division requirements and transfer to a California State University as a junior.

“The need for teachers is great, and COVID has magnified this problem,” Kerbey said. “Bay Area classroom kids need passionate and qualified teachers in their classrooms. We can help students begin the education they need to be those teachers.

There is still room in the Introductory Elementary Education course – Foothill can accommodate 40 students and the college has enrolled 20.

For more information on the program, visit foothill.edu/childdevelopment/nanny.html.


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Try the Ivy Leagues with these free college courses

Ivy League schools such as Harvard and Yale are renowned for offering some of the most prestigious academic programs in the world. These universities are sadly difficult to integrate, which makes them inaccessible to most. Moreover, the tuition fees are expensive, even with large scholarship opportunities.

Students looking for free online college courses may be surprised to find the options at Ivy League institutions. More and more universities are offering free college courses online, often in the form of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). These courses cover a wide range of topics in the arts, social sciences, STEM, and other fields.

While they usually don’t count toward a degree, MOOCs can provide learners with valuable and career-relevant knowledge. They also allow students to explore new interests and hobbies.

Ivy Leagues and online courses

MOOCs allow anyone to register and can serve hundreds of learners simultaneously. These courses combine traditional learning materials, such as lectures, with innovative elements, such as social media threads. Students typically take online quizzes and interact in discussion forums.

Ivy League schools were among the first to offer MOOCs. Stanford hosted its first MOOCs in 2011. The following year, professors at Stanford founded Coursera and Udacity, now two of the most popular MOOC platforms. Around the same time, Harvard and MIT teamed up to create edX, another popular online learning platform.

Ivy League schools offer MOOCs for various reasons, including expanding public access to education, building their reputation and conducting research on teaching and learning. MOOCs can also supplement classroom instruction.

Benefits of Enrolling in Free Online Ivy League Schools Courses

Free online college courses provide unprecedented access to high-quality Ivy League education. These courses also allow learners to explore interesting topics without the expense and high pressure of a traditional college course. Students who don’t like a MOOC can just quit without worrying about their GPA or registration record.

Sometimes these classes open up new career paths for students. Other times, learners take these courses for fun or to discover a passion outside of their chosen career.

Learners who engage in a series of MOOCs can gain in-depth, focused knowledge from top schools around the world. Sometimes they can receive a certificate of completion, often for a small fee.

However, most of the time, MOOCs do not lead to course credit, a diploma, or formal references. For learners who need formal credentials, online degree or certificate programs are generally better suited.

Some students find it difficult to complete courses without the structure and responsibility of formal education. Others strongly prefer the face-to-face interaction and relationship building offered by traditional institutions.

Free Ivy League Schools Online Courses

Regardless of their level of study or area of ​​interest, learners can find a MOOC that suits their needs. These free online courses range from general introductions to highly specialized niche courses. Here are some examples :

Yale University via Coursera

facebook-messenger.jpg

Shutterstock

This course teaches students how to analyze social media posts to distinguish fact from fiction – a valuable skill in the age of disinformation. Learners explore how to verify statements and differentiate between good and bad research.

Harvard University via edX

Group of students standing together in class and smiling.  Portrait of start-up entrepreneurs with arms crossed

Getty Images / iStockphoto

Many budding entrepreneurs are looking to rapidly developing markets like India, China and Latin America. Offered by the world-renowned Harvard Business School, this course explores how businesses can both generate profits and solve social problems.

Yale University via Coursera

handshake.jpg

Persuasion and negotiation are key skills for professionals in any industry, not just business. Students learn to negotiate via email, negotiate when lacking in power, examine power dynamics, and chat with people with different points of view.

Princeton University via Coursera

coursera-shutterstock-1643302312.jpg

The Dalai Lama encouraged scientists and academics to examine meditation and Buddhist ideas on the human mind. This class does just that, exploring Buddhist principles through the prism of psychology, neuroscience, philosophy, evolution, and religion.

Can I get my degree online for free?

It is generally not possible to obtain a degree online for free. Some MOOCs offer a certificate of completion for a small fee. In certain circumstances, you may be able to apply these certificate credits to a degree program.

Which online certification is the best?

The best online certification varies for everyone based on their individual interests and goals. However, any Ivy League school is a great choice for high quality learning material.

Which Ivy League schools offer free lessons?

There are eight Ivy League schools: Brown University, Columbia University, Cornell University, Dartmouth College, Harvard University, Princeton University, University of Pennsylvania, and Yale University. All of them offer free online courses through Coursera and edX.


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Study: There is a charge for taking college courses in high school; Jointly Enrolled Iowa Students More Likely to Pursue Graduate Studies | Government-and-politics






Iowa State University.


PHOTO FILE


Gazette Des Moines Office

DES MOINES – Students taking credit college courses in high school are more likely to enroll in post-secondary education after graduation and earn a college diploma or diploma, according to a new report from the Ministry of Education. ‘Iowa Education.

State officials reviewed data following 29,000 2011 graduating high school graduates over an eight-year period. Their report “Outcomes of Jointly Enrolled Students in Iowa” compared the post-secondary enrollment and completion rates of students who jointly enrolled in community college credit courses while in high school and students who did not.

“Earning college credit while in high school benefits students in many ways,” said a statement from Ann Lebo, director of the state’s education department. “Although we had a record number of co-enrolled students during the 2019-2020 academic year, we still have work to do.

“Closing the gap and ensuring that all high school students take advantage of these opportunities will help more students explore career paths and experience the rigor of college courses, setting them on the path to success at the college level. both in college and in their careers, ”Lebo added.

College is an exciting part of a young person’s life. What can parents do to help? Source by: Stringr



According to the agency’s findings, 75.5% of the 17,508 high school students in the 2011 class who obtained college credits in high school enrolled immediately after graduation and 59.1% of these students graduated in eight years.


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PCG Edutainment offers college courses to musical artists attending accredited universities across the United States; Partners with Kennesaw State University |

KENNESAW, Georgia., September 5, 2021 / PRNewswire-PRWeb / – Owner of Digital Science Media, Matej Harangozo, and CEO of PCG Artist Development, Bernard porter, launched its joint venture – PCG Edutainment in fall 2020. The company offers a college curriculum and instruction in music, social media, digital marketing, and artist development. The last partnership is with Kennesaw State University College of Professional Education under the Joel A. Katz Music and Entertainment Business Program.

The course “Social Media and Digital Marketing for Music Artists” will consist of two modules. The first module “Career Accelerator” takes place from October 6 to November 3, 2021 and the second module “Playing with the Majors” takes place from January 5 to February 2, 2022.

The sessions will be taught by the two music industry veterans – Harangozo and Porter – and will focus on the ever-changing music industry and social media platforms. This course explores the science behind building a strong artist brand online and the strategies for mastering all possible ways to monetize your music.

Students who register for the course at Kennesaw State University can expect to learn:

How to build a successful and engaging online brand;

How to identify and dissect the psychology of your target superfan;

An understanding of social media algorithms and how to leverage these platforms; and

How to master digital marketing skills and how to monetize your music brand.

This is the second official accredited program for PCG Edutainment. The pilot program was launched this fall under the official name of: PCG Artist Development at Visible Music College in Memphis, Tennessee. Harangozo and Porter share the common goal of being America’s leader in artist development and education. Further courses will be offered at various schools throughout 2021 and 2022.

For more information on PCG Edutainment, or if you would like to sign up for a program, send an email [email protected].

On Matej Harangozo

Award-winning entrepreneur, music enthusiast and innovative technologist. Matej Harangozo is a disruption engine with experience in developing cutting-edge automation platforms and protocols. A serial entrepreneur and web systems / software visionary, he is currently the co-owner and managing partner of Codaemon, an e-commerce solutions provider. In his quest to help independent artists get noticed, he also created Open Source Entertainment, a music business incubator, and Digital Science Media, his digital marketing arm. These two organizations are disrupting the music industry – representing emerging artists including Hello Sister, China Mac, the gospel label Black Smoke Music, and many others under the legend of the hip hop industry Wendy’s Day to name a few. Formerly recognized by the SBA as Maryland’s Young Entrepreneur of the Year, Harangozo lectures at universities and is a keynote speaker for TEDx and the Musician Mastery Summit. His companies have been featured in Forbes, Entrepreneur Magazine and The Baltimore Sun. Visit digitalsciencemedia.com to learn more.

On Bernard porter

CEO and Founder of PCG Artist Development and CEO and Co-Founder of PCG Theatrical, Bernard porter is a seasoned entertainment executive with 27 years of experience. His A&R prowess is recognized nationally. Porter was instrumental in signing the superstar Jason aldean at Broken Bow Records. A successful business entrepreneur, Porter has spent his career developing and securing high-profile joint ventures in the private and private sectors, guiding them through all phases of creative media, production, marketing and product launches. national. In addition, he has served as an entertainment consultant for numerous record labels, broadband networks, major recording artists, large corporations, state tourism boards as well as specialty venues including the Mall of America. To Minneapolis, Simon Mall properties, Dave & Buster’s and Marriott hotels. Visit PCGartistdevelopment.com to learn more.

Media contact

Matej Harangozo, Digital Science Media, +1 (443) 718-0003, [email protected]

Matej Harangozo, Digital science media, 4438126018, [email protected]

SOURCE Digital scientific media


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